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Social Inequalities in Secondhand Smoke Among Japanese Non-smokers: A Cross-Sectional Study

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Epidemiology, October 2017
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Title
Social Inequalities in Secondhand Smoke Among Japanese Non-smokers: A Cross-Sectional Study
Published in
Journal of Epidemiology, October 2017
DOI 10.2188/jea.je20160184
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yusuke Matsuyama, Jun Aida, Toru Tsuboya, Shihoko Koyama, Yukihiro Sato, Atsushi Hozawa, Ken Osaka

Abstract

Secondhand smoke (SHS) causes many deaths. Inequalities in SHS have been reported in several countries; however, the evidence in Asian countries is scarce. We aimed to investigate the association between socioeconomic status (SES) and SHS at home and the workplace/school among non-smoking Japanese adults. Cross-sectional data from the Miyagi Prefectural Health Survey 2014 were analyzed. Self-reported questionnaires were randomly distributed to residents ≥20 years of age and 2,443 (92.8%) responded. The data of the 1,738 and 1,003 respondents were included to the analyses for SHS in the past month at home and at the workplace/school, respectively. Ordered logistic regression models considering possible confounders, including knowledge of the adverse health effects of tobacco, were applied. The prevalence of SHS at home and the workplace/school was 19.0% and 39.0%, respectively. Compared with ≥13 years of education, odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for SHS at home were 1.94 (95% CI, 1.42-2.64) for 10-12 years and 3.00 (95% CI, 1.95-4.60) for ≤9 years; those for SHS at the workplace/school were 1.80 (95% CI, 1.36-2.39) and 3.82 (95% CI, 2.29-6.36), respectively. Knowledge of the adverse health effects of tobacco was significantly associated with lower SHS at home (OR 0.95; 95% CI, 0.91-0.98) but it was not associated with SHS at the workplace/school (OR 1.02; 95% CI, 0.98-1.06). Social inequalities in SHS existed among Japanese non-smoking adults. Knowledge about tobacco was negatively associated with SHS at home but not at workplace/school.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 39 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 18%
Researcher 4 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 10%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Student > Postgraduate 2 5%
Other 5 13%
Unknown 14 36%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 26%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Psychology 2 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 19 49%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 November 2017.
All research outputs
#16,036,648
of 25,376,589 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Epidemiology
#531
of 911 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#180,728
of 326,199 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Epidemiology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,376,589 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 911 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.0. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 326,199 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them