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COL5A1 gene variants previously associated with reduced soft tissue injury risk are associated with elite athlete status in rugby

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, November 2017
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 news outlets
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30 tweeters

Citations

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6 Dimensions

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73 Mendeley
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Title
COL5A1 gene variants previously associated with reduced soft tissue injury risk are associated with elite athlete status in rugby
Published in
BMC Genomics, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12864-017-4187-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shane M. Heffernan, Liam P. Kilduff, Robert M. Erskine, Stephen H. Day, Georgina K. Stebbings, Christian J. Cook, Stuart M. Raleigh, Mark A. Bennett, Guan Wang, Malcolm Collins, Yannis P. Pitsiladis, Alun G. Williams

Abstract

Two common single nucleotide polymorphisms within the COL5A1 gene (SNPs; rs12722 C/T and rs3196378 C/A) have previously been associated with tendon and ligament pathologies. Given the high incidence of tendon and ligament injuries in elite rugby athletes, we hypothesised that both SNPs would be associated with career success. In 1105 participants (RugbyGene project), comprising 460 elite rugby union (RU), 88 elite rugby league athletes and 565 non-athlete controls, DNA was collected and genotyped for the COL5A1 rs12722 and rs3196378 variants using real-time PCR. For rs12722, the injury-protective CC genotype and C allele were more common in all athletes (21% and 47%, respectively) and RU athletes (22% and 48%) than in controls (16% and 41%, P ≤ 0.01). For rs3196378, the CC genotype and C allele were overrepresented in all athletes (23% and 48%) and RU athletes (24% and 49%) compared with controls (16% and 41%, P ≤ 0.02). The CC genotype in particular was overrepresented in the back and centres (24%) compared with controls, with more than twice the odds (OR = 2.25, P = 0.006) of possessing the injury-protective CC genotype. Furthermore, when considering both SNPs simultaneously, the CC-CC SNP-SNP combination and C-C inferred allele combination were higher in all the athlete groups (≥18% and ≥43%) compared with controls (13% and 40%; P = 0.01). However, no genotype differences were identified for either SNP when RU playing positions were compared directly with each other. It appears that the C alleles, CC genotypes and resulting combinations of both rs12722 and rs3196378 are beneficial for rugby athletes to achieve elite status and carriage of these variants may impart an inherited resistance against soft tissue injury, despite exposure to the high-risk environment of elite rugby. These data have implications for the management of inter-individual differences in injury risk amongst elite athletes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 30 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 73 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 73 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 16%
Student > Bachelor 10 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 14%
Researcher 9 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 8%
Other 7 10%
Unknown 19 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 15 21%
Sports and Recreations 14 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 3%
Other 10 14%
Unknown 23 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 36. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 June 2019.
All research outputs
#569,655
of 15,305,941 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#100
of 8,673 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#20,869
of 317,795 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#12
of 828 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,305,941 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,673 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 317,795 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 828 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.