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Association between sarcopenia and low back pain in local residents prospective cohort study from the GAINA study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (62nd percentile)

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6 tweeters

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52 Mendeley
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Title
Association between sarcopenia and low back pain in local residents prospective cohort study from the GAINA study
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12891-017-1807-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shinji Tanishima, Hiroshi Hagino, Hiromi Matsumoto, Chika Tanimura, Hideki Nagashima

Abstract

Low back pain (LBP) is one of the most common ailments that people experience in their lifetime. On the other hands, Sarcopenia also leads to several physical symptoms and contributes to reducing the quality of life of elderly people.The purpose of this study is to investigate the association between sarcopenia and low back pain among the general population. The subjects included 216 adults (79 men and 137 women; mean age, 73.5 years) undergoing a general medical examination in Hino, Japan. Skeletal muscle index (SMI), The percentage of young adults' mean (%YAM) of the calcaneal bone mass using with quantitative ultrasound (QUS) method and walking speed were measured, and subjects who met the criteria of the Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia were assigned to the sarcopenia group. Subjects with decreased muscle mass only were assigned to the pre-sarcopenia group, and all other subjects were assigned to the normal group. Then, we compared the correlations with low back pain physical finding. The Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and the low back pain visual analogue scale (VAS) were used as indices of low back pain. Statistical analysis was performed among three groups with respect their characteristic, demographics, data of sarcopenia determining factor, VAS and ODI. We also analysed prevalence of LBP and sarcopenia. We investigated the correlations between ODI and the sarcopenia-determining factors of walking speed, muscle mass and grip strength. Sarcopenia was noted in 12 subjects (5.5%). The pre-sarcopenia group included 38 subjects (17.6%), and the normal group included 166 subjects (76.9%). The mean ODI score was significantly higher in the sarcopenia group (25.2% ± 12.3%; P < 0.05) than in the pre-sarcopenia group (11.2% ± 10.0%) and the normal group (11.9% ± 12.3%). %YAM and BMI were significantly lower in the sarcopenia group than in other groups (P < 0.05). A negative correlation existed between walking speed and ODI (r = -0.32, P < 0.001). The results of this study suggested that decreased physical ability due to quality of life in residents with LBP may be related to sarcopenia.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 52 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 52 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 13%
Researcher 7 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 12%
Other 6 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 8%
Other 13 25%
Unknown 9 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 15%
Sports and Recreations 6 12%
Neuroscience 2 4%
Engineering 2 4%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 17 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 May 2020.
All research outputs
#4,682,067
of 15,569,652 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#1,027
of 3,029 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#111,424
of 318,491 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#115
of 306 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,569,652 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 69th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,029 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 318,491 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 306 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.