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Homological scaffolds of brain functional networks

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of The Royal Society Interface, December 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#4 of 2,254)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Citations

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133 Dimensions

Readers on

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298 Mendeley
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3 CiteULike
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Title
Homological scaffolds of brain functional networks
Published in
Journal of The Royal Society Interface, December 2014
DOI 10.1098/rsif.2014.0873
Pubmed ID
Authors

G. Petri, P. Expert, F. Turkheimer, R. Carhart-Harris, D. Nutt, P. J. Hellyer, F. Vaccarino

Abstract

Networks, as efficient representations of complex systems, have appealed to scientists for a long time and now permeate many areas of science, including neuroimaging (Bullmore and Sporns 2009 Nat. Rev. Neurosci. 10, 186-198. (doi:10.1038/nrn2618)). Traditionally, the structure of complex networks has been studied through their statistical properties and metrics concerned with node and link properties, e.g. degree-distribution, node centrality and modularity. Here, we study the characteristics of functional brain networks at the mesoscopic level from a novel perspective that highlights the role of inhomogeneities in the fabric of functional connections. This can be done by focusing on the features of a set of topological objects-homological cycles-associated with the weighted functional network. We leverage the detected topological information to define the homological scaffolds, a new set of objects designed to represent compactly the homological features of the correlation network and simultaneously make their homological properties amenable to networks theoretical methods. As a proof of principle,we apply these tools to compare resting state functional brain activity in 15 healthy volunteers after intravenous infusion of placebo and psilocybin-the main psychoactive component of magic mushrooms. The results show that the homological structure of the brain's functional patterns undergoes a dramatic change post-psilocybin, characterized by the appearance of many transient structures of low stability and of a small number of persistent ones that are not observed in the case of placebo.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 356 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 298 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 1%
Japan 3 1%
Germany 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Czechia 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Other 8 3%
Unknown 274 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 54 18%
Student > Bachelor 52 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 52 17%
Researcher 38 13%
Other 19 6%
Other 61 20%
Unknown 22 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 52 17%
Neuroscience 50 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 34 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 31 10%
Mathematics 21 7%
Other 77 26%
Unknown 33 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 664. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 January 2020.
All research outputs
#10,341
of 14,202,103 outputs
Outputs from Journal of The Royal Society Interface
#4
of 2,254 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#143
of 300,636 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of The Royal Society Interface
#2
of 80 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,202,103 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,254 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 300,636 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 80 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.