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Prevalence and predictors of dual antiplatelet therapy prolongation beyond one year in patients with acute coronary syndrome

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, October 2017
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Title
Prevalence and predictors of dual antiplatelet therapy prolongation beyond one year in patients with acute coronary syndrome
Published in
PLoS ONE, October 2017
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0186961
Pubmed ID
Authors

Giuseppe Patti, Ilaria Cavallari, Emilia Antonucci, Paolo Calabrò, Plinio Cirillo, Paolo Gresele, Gualtiero Palareti, Vittorio Pengo, Pasquale Pignatelli, Elisabetta Ricottini, Rossella Marcucci

Abstract

There are limited real-world data on prevalence and predictors of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) prolongation beyond one year after acute coronary syndrome (ACS). We have explored such issue in the START ANTIPLATELET Registry, which is a prospective, observational, multicenter, Italian registry performed in seven Italian cardiology institutions including patients admitted for ACS and followed up to one year. Out of a total population of 840 ACS patients, 596 patients had completed 12-month follow-up being on DAPT. Decision to prolong DAPT beyond one year was taken in 79 patients (13%), whereas in 517 patients DAPT was stopped. The strongest predictors of DAPT continuation were a new cardiovascular events after the index admission event (OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.4-7.7), no bleeding complications (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.2-8.3) and no anemia during one-year follow-up (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.1-5.9); other independent predictors were renal failure (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.3-5.0) and peripheral artery disease (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.1-3.0). The choice of DAPT prolongation was not correlated with younger ager, presence of diabetes mellitus, coronary angioplasty as initial treatment strategy or type of implanted stent (drug-eluting vs bare metal). In conclusion, this study provides a real-world snapshot on the factors influencing the option to continue DAPT beyond one year after ACS; a low bleeding risk seems to influence the choice to prolong DAPT more than a high ischemic risk.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 6 24%
Student > Postgraduate 4 16%
Student > Bachelor 4 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 12%
Researcher 3 12%
Other 5 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 36%
Unspecified 9 36%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 8%
Neuroscience 1 4%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 November 2017.
All research outputs
#10,775,640
of 12,151,889 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#113,389
of 133,571 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#275,402
of 331,744 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#3,716
of 4,642 outputs
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