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The Effect of Head-to-Head Competition on Behavioural Thermoregulation, Thermophysiological Strain and Performance During Exercise in the Heat

Overview of attention for article published in Sports Medicine, November 2017
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
58 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
49 Mendeley
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Title
The Effect of Head-to-Head Competition on Behavioural Thermoregulation, Thermophysiological Strain and Performance During Exercise in the Heat
Published in
Sports Medicine, November 2017
DOI 10.1007/s40279-017-0816-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jo Corbett, Danny K. White, Martin J. Barwood, Christopher R. D. Wagstaff, Michael J. Tipton, Terry McMorris, Joseph T. Costello

Abstract

It has been suggested that pacing is a thermoregulatory behaviour. We investigated the effect of competition on pacing, performance and thermophysiological strain during exercise in the heat and the psychological factors mediating competition effects. Eighteen males (maximum oxygen uptake [V O 2max] 3.69 [0.44] L min(-1)) undertook a preliminary 20-km cool (wet-bulb globe temperature [WBGT] 12 °C) cycling time trial (TT) and three experimental 20-km trials (balanced order): (i) cool TT (CoolSolo); (ii) hot (WBGT 26 °C) TT (HotSolo); (iii) hot head-to-head competition (HotH2H). During TTs, an avatar of the participant's performance was visible. During HotH2H, participants believed they were competing against another participant, but the competitor's avatar replicated their own preliminary (cool) TT. TTs (min:sec [SD]) slowed with increased ambient temperature [CoolSolo 35:31 (2:11) versus HotSolo 36:10 (2:26); p = 0.011]. This effect was negated by competition; performances were not different between HotH2H [35:17 (1:52)] and CoolSolo (p = 0.160) and were quicker in HotH2H versus HotSolo (p = 0.001). End-exercise rectal temperature, mean body temperature and physiological strain index were (p < 0.05) higher in HotH2H than either solo condition. Despite faster performance and greater thermophysiological strain, rating of perceived exertion (RPE), thermal comfort and sensation, and perceptual strain index were not different between HotH2H and HotSolo. The difference in end-exercise rectal temperature between HotH2H and HotSolo was related to pre-exercise anticipatory heart rate response (r = 0.608, p = 0.010) and participants' propensity for deliberate risk-taking (B = 0.12, p < 0.001), whereas self-reported resilience predicted change in performance times between HotH2H versus HotSolo (B = - 9.40, p = 0.010). Competition changes the relationship between perceived and actual thermophysiological state, altering behavioural thermoregulation and increasing thermophysiological strain; this could increase heat-illness risk. Psychophysiological and psychological measures may identify susceptible individuals.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 58 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 49 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 24%
Unspecified 9 18%
Student > Master 9 18%
Researcher 4 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Other 12 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 21 43%
Unspecified 14 29%
Psychology 5 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Other 4 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 53. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 April 2018.
All research outputs
#319,614
of 13,397,525 outputs
Outputs from Sports Medicine
#351
of 2,186 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,570
of 382,942 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Sports Medicine
#27
of 57 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,397,525 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,186 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 31.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 382,942 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 57 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.