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‘Jumping around’: exploring young women's behaviour and knowledge in relation to sexual health in a remote Aboriginal Australian community

Overview of attention for article published in Culture, Health & Sexuality, August 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source

Citations

dimensions_citation
20 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
83 Mendeley
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Title
‘Jumping around’: exploring young women's behaviour and knowledge in relation to sexual health in a remote Aboriginal Australian community
Published in
Culture, Health & Sexuality, August 2014
DOI 10.1080/13691058.2014.937747
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sarah Ireland, Concepta Wulili Narjic, Suzanne Belton, Sherry Saggers, Ann McGrath

Abstract

Sexual health indicators for young remote-living Aboriginal women are the worst of all of Australian women. This study aimed to describe and explore young women's behaviour and knowledge in relation to sexual health, as well as to provide health professionals with cross-cultural insights to assist with health practice. A descriptive ethnographic study was conducted, which included: extended ethnographic field work in one remote community over a six-year period; community observation and participation; field notes; semi-structured interviews; group reproductive ethno-physiology drawing and language sessions; focus-group sessions; training and employment of Aboriginal research assistants; and consultation and advice from a local reference group and a Cultural Mentor. Findings reveal that young women in this remote community have a very poor biomedical understanding of sexually transmitted infections and contraception. This is further compounded by not speaking English as a first language, low literacy levels and different beliefs in relation to body functions. In their sexual relationships, young women often report experiences involving multiple casual partners, marijuana use and violence. Together, the findings contribute to a better understanding of the factors underlying sexual health inequity among young Aboriginal women in Australia.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 83 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Unknown 82 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 13 16%
Student > Master 11 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 13%
Researcher 9 11%
Other 7 8%
Other 14 17%
Unknown 18 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 23%
Social Sciences 12 14%
Psychology 9 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 2%
Other 10 12%
Unknown 22 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 April 2020.
All research outputs
#6,176,680
of 19,002,645 outputs
Outputs from Culture, Health & Sexuality
#523
of 1,127 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#100,500
of 329,012 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Culture, Health & Sexuality
#10
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,002,645 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,127 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.5. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 329,012 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.