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Fertility desire among HIV-positive women in Tigray region, Ethiopia: implications for the provision of reproductive health and prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission services

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Women's Health, November 2014
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2 tweeters

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Title
Fertility desire among HIV-positive women in Tigray region, Ethiopia: implications for the provision of reproductive health and prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission services
Published in
BMC Women's Health, November 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12905-014-0137-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yohannes Adama Melaku, Ejigu Gebeye Zeleke, John Kinsman, Akberet Kelem Abraha

Abstract

BackgroundThere is growing recognition of the difficult reproductive decisions faced by HIV-positive women. Studies in both resource-constrained and developed countries have suggested that many HIV-positive women continue to desire children in spite of their understanding of the possible risks that HIV poses. This study investigates the factors associated with fertility desire among HIV-positive women in Tigray region, Ethiopia.MethodsA cross-sectional survey was conducted among 964 HIV-positive women receiving HIV care in 12 health centers of Tigray region. In each health center, the number of study participants was allocated proportionally to the load of HIV-positive women in the chronic care clinics. A descriptive summary of the data and a logistic regression model were used to identify factors associated with fertility desire using odds ratios with a 95% confidence interval and P-value of 0.05.ResultsFour hundred and thirty nine (45.5%) of the participants reported a desire to have children in the future. Eighty six percent of the women had given birth to at least one live baby at the time of study, with the median number of live births being 2 (Inter quartile range¿=¿1,3). Women in the age group of 15¿24 years [AOR¿=¿2.64(95% CI: 1.44, 4.83)] and 25¿34 years [AOR¿=¿2.37(95% CI: 1.60, 2.4 3.50)] had higher fertility desire as compared to women in the age group of 35¿49 years. Having no children [AOR¿=¿25.76(95% CI: 13.66, 48.56)], having one to two children [AOR¿=¿5.14 (95%CI: 3.37, 7.84)] and disclosing HIV status to husband/sexual partner [AOR¿=¿1.74(95% CI: 1.11, 2.72)] were all independently associated with fertility desire.ConclusionsAge, HIV disclosure status to husband/sexual partner, and relatively few live children were all found to influence HIV-positive women¿s fertility desire. Programmers and policy makers should consider the effects of these factors for HIV-positive women as they develop HIV/AIDS interventions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 103 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 102 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 22 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 11%
Researcher 9 9%
Student > Bachelor 7 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 6%
Other 20 19%
Unknown 28 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 20 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 19 18%
Social Sciences 15 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 5%
Unspecified 3 3%
Other 12 12%
Unknown 29 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 November 2014.
All research outputs
#16,603,678
of 21,321,365 outputs
Outputs from BMC Women's Health
#1,225
of 1,547 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#234,723
of 346,090 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Women's Health
#99
of 125 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,321,365 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,547 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.8. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 346,090 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 125 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.