↓ Skip to main content

Community resistance to a peer education programme in Zimbabwe

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, November 2014
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (74th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
8 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
71 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Community resistance to a peer education programme in Zimbabwe
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, November 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12913-014-0574-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Catherine Campbell, Kerry Scott, Zivai Mupambireyi, Mercy Nhamo, Constance Nyamukapa, Morten Skovdal, Simon Gregson

Abstract

BackgroundThis paper presents community perceptions of a state-of-the-art peer education programme in Manicaland, Zimbabwe. While the intervention succeeded in increasing HIV knowledge among men and condom acceptability among women, and reduced HIV incidence and rates of unprotected sex among men who attended education events, it did not succeed in reducing population-level HIV incidence. To understand the possible reasons for this disappointing result, we conducted a qualitative study of local perspectives of the intervention.MethodsEight focus group discussions and 11 interviews with 81 community members and local project staff were conducted. Transcripts were interrogated and analysed thematically.ResultsWe identified three factors that may have contributed to the programme¿s disappointing outcomes: (1) difficulties of implementing all elements of the programme, particularly the proposed income generation component in the wider context of economic strain; (2) a moralistic approach to commercial sex work by programme staff; and (3) limitations in the programme¿s ability to engage with social realities facing community members.ConclusionsWe conclude that externally-imposed programmes that present new information without adequately engaging with local realities and constraints on action can be met by resistance to change.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 71 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 1%
Unknown 70 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 21%
Researcher 14 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 15%
Lecturer 4 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 6%
Other 14 20%
Unknown 9 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 19 27%
Social Sciences 14 20%
Psychology 6 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 7%
Computer Science 2 3%
Other 10 14%
Unknown 15 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 May 2015.
All research outputs
#1,020,668
of 5,131,029 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#571
of 2,269 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#37,734
of 171,694 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#32
of 126 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,131,029 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,269 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 171,694 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 126 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.