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Impaired spatial selectivity and intact phase precession in two-dimensional virtual reality

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Neuroscience, November 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
11 news outlets
blogs
12 blogs
twitter
28 X users
facebook
2 Facebook pages
googleplus
7 Google+ users
video
1 YouTube creator

Citations

dimensions_citation
227 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
505 Mendeley
citeulike
4 CiteULike
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Title
Impaired spatial selectivity and intact phase precession in two-dimensional virtual reality
Published in
Nature Neuroscience, November 2014
DOI 10.1038/nn.3884
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zahra M Aghajan, Lavanya Acharya, Jason J Moore, Jesse D Cushman, Cliff Vuong, Mayank R Mehta

Abstract

During real-world (RW) exploration, rodent hippocampal activity shows robust spatial selectivity, which is hypothesized to be governed largely by distal visual cues, although other sensory-motor cues also contribute. Indeed, hippocampal spatial selectivity is weak in primate and human studies that use only visual cues. To determine the contribution of distal visual cues only, we measured hippocampal activity from body-fixed rodents exploring a two-dimensional virtual reality (VR). Compared to that in RW, spatial selectivity was markedly reduced during random foraging and goal-directed tasks in VR. Instead we found small but significant selectivity to distance traveled. Despite impaired spatial selectivity in VR, most spikes occurred within ∼2-s-long hippocampal motifs in both RW and VR that had similar structure, including phase precession within motif fields. Selectivity to space and distance traveled were greatly enhanced in VR tasks with stereotypical trajectories. Thus, distal visual cues alone are insufficient to generate a robust hippocampal rate code for space but are sufficient for a temporal code.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 28 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 505 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 19 4%
United Kingdom 5 <1%
Germany 4 <1%
Portugal 2 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Finland 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Other 2 <1%
Unknown 468 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 144 29%
Researcher 93 18%
Student > Master 61 12%
Student > Bachelor 38 8%
Professor 24 5%
Other 68 13%
Unknown 77 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 156 31%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 117 23%
Psychology 34 7%
Engineering 25 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 23 5%
Other 64 13%
Unknown 86 17%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 185. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 May 2023.
All research outputs
#223,630
of 26,038,372 outputs
Outputs from Nature Neuroscience
#370
of 5,692 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,340
of 372,843 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Neuroscience
#2
of 89 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 26,038,372 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,692 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 58.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 372,843 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 89 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.