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A meta-analysis of the genomic and transcriptomic composition of complex life

Overview of attention for article published in Cell Cycle, June 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
22 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
69 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
108 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
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Title
A meta-analysis of the genomic and transcriptomic composition of complex life
Published in
Cell Cycle, June 2013
DOI 10.4161/cc.25134
Pubmed ID
Authors

Liu G, Mattick JS, Taft RJ, Liu, Ganqiang, Mattick, John S, Taft, Ryan J, Gangiang Liu, John Mattick, Ryan J. Taft

Abstract

It is now clear that animal genomes are predominantly non-protein-coding, and that these sequences encode a wide array of RNA transcripts and other regulatory elements that are fundamental to the development of complex life. We have previously argued that the proportion of an animal genome that is non-protein-coding DNA (ncDNA) correlates well with its apparent biological complexity. Here we extend on that work and, using data from a total of 1,627 prokaryotic and 153 eukaryotic complete and annotated genomes, show that the proportion of ncDNA per haploid genome is significantly positively correlated with a previously published proxy of biological complexity, the number of distinct cell types. This is in contrast to the amount of the genome that encodes proteins, which we show is essentially unchanged across Metazoa. Furthermore, using a total of 179 RNA-seq data sets from nematode (47), fruit fly (72), zebrafish (20) and human (42), we show, consistent with other recent reports, that the vast majority of ncDNA in animals is transcribed. This includes more than 60 human loci previously considered "gene deserts," many of which are expressed tissue-specifically and associated with previously reported GWAS SNPs. These results suggest that ncDNA, and the ncRNAs encoded within it, may be intimately involved in the evolution, maintenance and development of complex life.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 22 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 108 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 3%
United Kingdom 2 2%
Germany 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Unknown 98 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 33 31%
Student > Master 17 16%
Researcher 17 16%
Unspecified 8 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 6 6%
Other 27 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 48 44%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 35 32%
Unspecified 7 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 5%
Neuroscience 3 3%
Other 10 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 January 2017.
All research outputs
#897,290
of 11,777,417 outputs
Outputs from Cell Cycle
#75
of 2,822 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#23,998
of 253,987 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cell Cycle
#15
of 251 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,777,417 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,822 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 253,987 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 251 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.