↓ Skip to main content

Growth, mortality and susceptibility of oyster Crassostrea spp. to Perkinsus spp. infection during on growing in northeast Brazil

Overview of attention for article published in Revista brasileira de parasitologia veterinaria = Brazilian journal of veterinary parasitology : Orgao Oficial do Colegio Brasileiro de Parasitologia Veterinaria, November 2017
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
19 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Growth, mortality and susceptibility of oyster Crassostrea spp. to Perkinsus spp. infection during on growing in northeast Brazil
Published in
Revista brasileira de parasitologia veterinaria = Brazilian journal of veterinary parasitology : Orgao Oficial do Colegio Brasileiro de Parasitologia Veterinaria, November 2017
DOI 10.1590/s1984-29612017061
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marcos Paiva Scardua, Rogério Tubino Vianna, Sâmia Sousa Duarte, Natanael Dantas Farias, Maria Luíza Dias Correia, Helen Taynara Araújo dos Santos, Patricia Mirella da Silva

Abstract

Crassostrea rhizophorae and C. gasar oysters are cultivated in the northeast region. Perkinsus parasites infect bivalves, and their effects on oysters from tropical regions are poorly understood. This study evaluated the impact of Perkinsus infection on the productive traits of native oysters. Oysters were sampled bimonthly during 7 months, from July 2010 to February 2011, to evaluate growth rate, mortality and shell color patterns (white and dark-gray) (n = 500), and to determine the prevalence and intensity of Perkinsus (n = 152). Perkinsus and Crassostrea species were determined using molecular tools. Results showed that most dark-gray (90%, n = 20) and white (67%, n = 18) oysters were C. gasar and C. rhizophorae, respectively. Oysters showed a high growth rate and moderate cumulative mortality (44%). C. gasar oysters grew better and showed lower mortality and lower incidence of Perkinsus compared to C. rhizophorae. The mean prevalence of Perkinsus was moderate (48%), but the infection intensity was light (2.2). Perkinsosis affected very small oysters (19.4 mm). In conclusion, native oysters, especially C. gasar, have a great potential for culture, mortality is not associated with perkinsosis, and the shell color of oysters can be used to improve selection for spats with better performance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 19 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 16%
Researcher 3 16%
Student > Bachelor 2 11%
Student > Postgraduate 2 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 11%
Other 2 11%
Unknown 5 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 37%
Environmental Science 3 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 11%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 5%
Psychology 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 5 26%