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A village level cluster-randomized entomological evaluation of combination long-lasting insecticidal nets containing pyrethroid plus PBO synergist in Southern Mali

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, November 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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51 Mendeley
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Title
A village level cluster-randomized entomological evaluation of combination long-lasting insecticidal nets containing pyrethroid plus PBO synergist in Southern Mali
Published in
Malaria Journal, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12936-017-2124-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Moussa B. M. Cisse, Djibril Sangare, Richard M. Oxborough, Abdourhamane Dicko, Dereje Dengela, Aboubacar Sadou, Jules Mihigo, Kristen George, Laura Norris, Christen Fornadel

Abstract

There is growing concern that malaria vector resistance to pyrethroid insecticides may reduce the effectiveness of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs). Combination LLINs are designed to control susceptible and pyrethroid-resistant mosquito populations through a mixture of pyrethroid with piperonyl butoxide (PBO) synergist. A cluster randomized trial with entomology outcome measures was conducted in Mali to determine the added benefit over mono-treated pyrethroid predecessors. Four LLIN treatments; permethrin + PBO, permethrin, deltamethrin + PBO, and deltamethrin, were randomly allocated to four villages each (16 villages total) and distributed to cover every sleeping place. Entomological monitoring of indoor Anopheles resting densities, host preference, vector longevity, and sporozoite rates were monitored every 2 months over 2 years in 2014 and 2015. Bottle bioassays confirmed permethrin and deltamethrin resistance in Anopheles gambiae sensu lato (s.l.), (the predominant species throughout the study) with pre-exposure to PBO indicating partial involvement of oxidases. Between 2014 and 2015 the mean indoor resting density was greater in the deltamethrin + PBO LLIN arm than the deltamethrin LLIN arm at 3.05 (95% CI 3.00-3.10) An. gambiae s.l. per room per day compared with 1.9 (95% CI 1.87-1.97). There was no significant difference in sporozoite rate at 3.97% (95% CI 2.91-5.02) for the deltamethrin LLIN arm and 3.04% (95% CI 2.21-3.87) for deltamethrin + PBO LLIN arm (P = 0.17). However, when analysed by season there was some evidence that the sporozoite rate was lower in the deltamethrin + PBO LLIN arm than deltamethrin LLIN arm during the rainy/high malaria transmission seasons at 1.95% (95% CI 1.18-2.72) and 3.70% (95% CI 2.56-4.84) respectively (P = 0.01). While there was some evidence that An. gambiae s.l. sporozoite rates were lower in villages with deltamethrin + PBO LLINs during the high malaria transmission seasons of 2014-2015, there was no reduction in parity rates or indoor resting densities. There was also no evidence that permethrin + PBO LLINs provided any improved control when compared with permethrin LLINs. Combination nets may have a greater impact in areas where mixed function oxidases play a more important role in pyrethroid resistance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 51 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 17 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 16%
Student > Master 6 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Other 3 6%
Other 7 14%
Unknown 7 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 14%
Environmental Science 6 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 4%
Other 8 16%
Unknown 11 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 November 2017.
All research outputs
#6,527,650
of 12,181,658 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#2,013
of 3,557 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#138,504
of 337,032 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#85
of 121 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,181,658 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,557 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 337,032 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 121 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.