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Use of wearable devices for post-discharge monitoring of ICU patients: a feasibility study

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Intensive Care, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#48 of 445)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
38 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
37 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
120 Mendeley
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Title
Use of wearable devices for post-discharge monitoring of ICU patients: a feasibility study
Published in
Journal of Intensive Care, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40560-017-0261-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ryan R. Kroll, Erica D. McKenzie, J. Gordon Boyd, Prameet Sheth, Daniel Howes, Michael Wood, David M. Maslove

Abstract

Wearable devices generate signals detecting activity, sleep, and heart rate, all of which could enable detailed and near-continuous characterization of recovery following critical illness. To determine the feasibility of using a wrist-worn personal fitness tracker among patients recovering from critical illness, we conducted a prospective observational study of a convenience sample of 50 stable ICU patients. We assessed device wearability, the extent of data capture, sensitivity and specificity for detecting heart rate excursions, and correlations with questionnaire-derived sleep quality measures. Wearable devices were worn over a 24-h period, with excellent capture of data. While specificity for the detection of tachycardia was high (98.8%), sensitivity was low to moderate (69.5%). There was a moderate correlation between wearable-derived sleep duration and questionnaire-derived sleep quality (r = 0.33, P = 0.03). Devices were well-tolerated and demonstrated no degradation in quality of data acquisition over time. We found that wearable devices could be worn by patients recovering from critical illness and could generate useful data for the majority of patients with little adverse effect. Further development and study are needed to better define and enhance the role of wearables in the monitoring of post-ICU recovery. Clinicaltrials.gov, NCT02527408.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 38 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 120 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 120 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 19%
Student > Bachelor 15 13%
Researcher 13 11%
Student > Master 13 11%
Other 10 8%
Other 22 18%
Unknown 24 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 36 30%
Engineering 9 8%
Computer Science 7 6%
Sports and Recreations 6 5%
Psychology 5 4%
Other 22 18%
Unknown 35 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 23. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 February 2018.
All research outputs
#1,133,364
of 19,240,244 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Intensive Care
#48
of 445 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#36,219
of 429,993 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Intensive Care
#6
of 66 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,240,244 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 445 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 429,993 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 66 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.