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Association of postoperative nausea/vomiting and pain with breastfeeding success

Overview of attention for article published in Perioperative Medicine, November 2017
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Title
Association of postoperative nausea/vomiting and pain with breastfeeding success
Published in
Perioperative Medicine, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13741-017-0075-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ramon Abola, Jamie Romeiser, Suman Grewal, Sabeen Rizwan, Rishimani Adsumelli, Ellen Steinberg, Elliott Bennett-Guerrero

Abstract

Successful breastfeeding is a goal set forth by the World Health Organization to improve neonatal care. Increasingly, patients express the desire to breastfeed, and clinicians should facilitate successful breastfeeding. The primary aim of this study is to determine if postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) or postoperative pain are associated with decreased breastfeeding success after cesarean delivery. This is a historical cohort study using the Stony Brook Elective Cesarean Delivery Database. Self-reported breastfeeding success at 4 weeks postoperative was analyzed for associations with postoperative antiemetic use and postoperative pain scores. Breastfeeding success was also analyzed for associations with patient factors and anesthetic medications. Overall, 86% of patients (n = 81) who intended on breastfeeding reported breastfeeding success. Breastfeeding success was not associated with postoperative nausea or vomiting as measured by post anesthesia care unit antiemetic use (15% use in successful vs. 18% use in unsuccessful, p = 0.67) or 48-h antiemetic use (28% use in successful group vs 36% use in unsuccessful group, p = 0.732). Pain visual analog scale scores at 6, 12 and 24 h postoperatively were not significantly different between patients with or without breastfeeding success. Breastfeeding success was associated with having had at least 1 previous child (86% vs 36%, p < 0.001). Patients with asthma were less likely to have breastfeeding success (45% vs 4%, p = 0.002). Efforts to improve PONV and pain after cesarean delivery may not be effective in improving breastfeeding success. To possibly improve breastfeeding rates, resources should be directed toward patients with no previous children and patients with asthma.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 8 62%
Student > Master 2 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Librarian 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 38%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 31%
Psychology 1 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 8%
Materials Science 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 November 2017.
All research outputs
#9,351,743
of 12,184,158 outputs
Outputs from Perioperative Medicine
#80
of 109 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#220,907
of 337,445 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Perioperative Medicine
#7
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,184,158 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 109 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 337,445 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.