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How do we use therapeutic drug monitoring to improve outcomes from severe infections in critically ill patients?

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, November 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
17 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
42 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
134 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
How do we use therapeutic drug monitoring to improve outcomes from severe infections in critically ill patients?
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, November 2014
DOI 10.1186/1471-2334-14-288
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gloria Wong, Fekade Bruck Sime, Jeffrey Lipman, Jason A Roberts

Abstract

High mortality and morbidity rates associated with severe infections in the critically ill continue to be a significant issue for the healthcare system. In view of the diverse and unique pharmacokinetic profile of drugs in this patient population, there is increasing use of therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) in attempt to optimize the exposure of antibiotics, improve clinical outcome and minimize the emergence of antibiotic resistance. Despite this, a beneficial clinical outcome for TDM of antibiotics has only been demonstrated for aminoglycosides in a general hospital patient population. Clinical outcome studies for other antibiotics remain elusive. Further, there is significant variability among institutions with respect to the practice of TDM including the selection of patients, sampling time for concentration monitoring, methodologies of antibiotic assay, selection of PK/PD targets as well as dose optimisation strategies. The aim of this paper is to review the available evidence relating to practices of antibiotic TDM, and describe how TDM can be applied to potentially improve outcomes from severe infections in the critically ill.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 17 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 134 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 2%
Colombia 2 1%
Zimbabwe 1 <1%
Unknown 128 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 18%
Student > Master 24 18%
Other 21 16%
Researcher 16 12%
Student > Bachelor 13 10%
Other 36 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 60 45%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 27 20%
Unspecified 18 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 7%
Chemistry 8 6%
Other 12 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 May 2015.
All research outputs
#792,968
of 12,373,180 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#178
of 4,592 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#20,555
of 275,284 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#27
of 633 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,373,180 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,592 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,284 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 633 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.