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Evaluation of phytotherapy alternatives for controlling Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus in vitro

Overview of attention for article published in Revista Brasileira de Parasitologia Veterinária, September 2017
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Title
Evaluation of phytotherapy alternatives for controlling Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus in vitro
Published in
Revista Brasileira de Parasitologia Veterinária, September 2017
DOI 10.1590/s1984-29612017052
Pubmed ID
Authors

José Pablo Villarreal Villarreal, Pedro Rassier dos Santos, Maria Antonieta Machado Pereira da Silva, Rosaria Helena Machado Azambuja, Carolina Lambrecht Gonçalves, Jesus Jaime Hernández Escareño, Tânia Regina Bettin dos Santos, Claudio Martin Pereira de Pereira, Rogério Antonio Freitag, Patrícia da Silva Nascente

Abstract

The objective of this study was to identify the main chemical components of the essential oil of Cuminum cyminum L. (cumin) and of the fixed oils of Bertholletia excelsa (Brazil nut) and of Helianthus annuus (sunflower seed). As well as testing the three oils and three different commercial synthetic acaricides against engorged females of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus in order to explore their acaricidal efficacy. Six different concentrations of the oils (200, 100, 50, 25, 12.5 and 6.25 mg/mL) and the active principles were evaluated with the Adult Immersion Test (AIT). The two main chemicals components of C. cyminum L. were the cuminaldehyde and the γ-terpinene. In both B. excelsa and H. annuus were the linoleic and oleic acid. C. cyminum L. showed high acaricidal activity (100%) over the engorged females and on their reproductive characteristat from the concentration of 100 mg/mL. B. excelsa and H. annuus had low acaricidal activity (39.39% and 58.75% in the concentration of 200 mg/mL respectively). The amidine and the pyrethroid (35.12% and 1.50% respectively). It can be concluded that the oil of C. cyminum L. may be a phytoterapic alternative for the cattle's tick control.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 31%
Student > Master 3 23%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 15%
Student > Postgraduate 2 15%
Researcher 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 38%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 15%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 2 15%