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Male-specific phosphorylated SR proteins in adult flies of the Mediterranean Fruitfly Ceratitis capitata

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genetics, January 2014
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Title
Male-specific phosphorylated SR proteins in adult flies of the Mediterranean Fruitfly Ceratitis capitata
Published in
BMC Genetics, January 2014
DOI 10.1186/1471-2156-15-s2-s6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Giuseppe Saccone, Christos Louis, Hongyou Zhang, Valeria Petrella, Manuela Natale, Maria Perri, Marco Salvemini

Abstract

Alternative splicing is a widely used mechanism of gene regulation in sex determination pathways of Insects. In species from orders as distant as Diptera, Hymenoptera and Coleoptera, female differentiation relies on the activities of conserved splicing regulators, TRA and TRA-2, promoting female-specific expression of the global effector doublesex (dsx). Less understood is to what extent post-translational modifications of splicing regulators plays a role in this pathway. In Drosophila melanogaster phosphorylation of TRA, TRA-2 and the general RBP1 factor by the LAMMER kinase doa (darkener of apricot) is required for proper female sex determination. To explore whether this is a general feature of the pathway we examined sex-specific differences in phosphorylation levels of SR splicing factors in the dipteran species D. melanogaster, Ceratitis capitata (Medfly) and Musca domestica (Housefly). We found a distinct and reproducible pattern of male-specific phosphorylation on protein extracts enriched for SR proteins in C. capitata suggesting that differential phosphorylation may also contribute to the regulation of sex-specific splicing in the Medfly.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Czechia 1 6%
Unknown 17 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 33%
Researcher 3 17%
Professor 2 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 6%
Other 2 11%
Unknown 2 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 67%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 6%
Physics and Astronomy 1 6%
Unknown 2 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 December 2014.
All research outputs
#3,716,662
of 4,586,246 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genetics
#390
of 485 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#115,741
of 147,758 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genetics
#29
of 36 outputs
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