↓ Skip to main content

San Francisco Children Living In Redeveloped Public Housing Used Acute Services Less Than Children In Older Public Housing

Overview of attention for article published in Health Affairs, December 2014
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
twitter
9 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
9 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
40 Mendeley
Title
San Francisco Children Living In Redeveloped Public Housing Used Acute Services Less Than Children In Older Public Housing
Published in
Health Affairs, December 2014
DOI 10.1377/hlthaff.2014.1021
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ellen E. Kersten, Kaja Z. LeWinn, Laura Gottlieb, Douglas P. Jutte, Nancy E. Adler

Abstract

Understanding the links between housing and health is increasingly important. Poor housing quality is a predictor of poor health and developmental problems in low-income children. We examined associations between public housing type and recurrent pediatric emergency and urgent care hospital visits. Children ages 0-18 with public insurance who sought emergency care from any of three large medical systems in San Francisco were categorized by whether they lived in public housing redeveloped through the federal HOPE VI program, nonredeveloped public housing, or nonpublic housing in a census tract that also contained public housing. After we adjusted for potential confounding characteristics, we found that children living in nonredeveloped public housing were 39 percent more likely to have one or more repeat visits within one year for acute health care services unrelated to the initial visit, compared to children who lived in redeveloped HOPE VI housing. We observed no differences in repeat visits between children in redeveloped HOPE VI housing and those in nonpublic housing. These findings support the continued redevelopment of public housing as a means of both improving the health of vulnerable high-risk children from low-income neighborhoods and reducing health care costs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 1 3%
Canada 1 3%
Unknown 38 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 18%
Student > Master 6 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 10%
Other 4 10%
Student > Postgraduate 4 10%
Other 10 25%
Unknown 5 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 40%
Social Sciences 11 28%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 3 8%
Psychology 1 3%
Unknown 9 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 32. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 April 2018.
All research outputs
#465,669
of 12,775,568 outputs
Outputs from Health Affairs
#1,481
of 4,920 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,855
of 293,071 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Health Affairs
#36
of 81 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,775,568 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,920 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 46.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 293,071 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 81 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.