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MHC class II DRB diversity predicts antigen recognition and is associated with disease severity in California sea lions naturally infected with Leptospira interrogans

Overview of attention for article published in Infection, Genetics & Evolution, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (60th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (77th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 policy source

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
44 Mendeley
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Title
MHC class II DRB diversity predicts antigen recognition and is associated with disease severity in California sea lions naturally infected with Leptospira interrogans
Published in
Infection, Genetics & Evolution, January 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.meegid.2017.11.023
Pubmed ID
Authors

Karina Acevedo-Whitehouse, Frances M.D. Gulland, Lizabeth Bowen

Abstract

We examined the associations between California sea lion MHC class II DRB (Zaca-DRB) configuration and diversity, and leptospirosis. As Zaca-DRB gene sequences are involved with antigen presentation of bacteria and other extracellular pathogens, we predicted that they would play a role in determining responses to these pathogenic spirochaetes. Specifically, we investigated whether Zaca-DRB diversity (number of genes) and configuration (presence of specific genes) explained differences in disease severity, and whether higher levels of Zaca-DRB diversity predicted the number of specific Leptospira interrogans serovars that a sea lion's serum would react against. We found that serum from diseased sea lions with more Zaca-DRB loci reacted against a wider array of serovars. Specific Zaca-DRB loci were linked to reactions with particular serovars. Interestingly, sea lions with clinical manifestation of leptospirosis that had higher numbers of Zaca-DRB loci were less likely to recover from disease than those with lower diversity, and those that harboured Zaca-DRB.C or -G were 4.5 to 5.3 times more likely to die from leptospirosis, regardless of the infective serovars. We propose that for leptospirosis, a disadvantage of having a wider range of antigen presentation might be increased disease severity due to immunopathology. Ours is the first study to examine the importance of Zaca-DRB diversity for antigen detection and disease severity following natural exposure to infective leptospires.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 44 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 14%
Student > Master 5 11%
Student > Bachelor 5 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Other 5 11%
Unknown 13 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 27%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 5 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 5%
Environmental Science 1 2%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 15 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 March 2018.
All research outputs
#5,609,976
of 17,366,233 outputs
Outputs from Infection, Genetics & Evolution
#515
of 2,466 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#150,450
of 419,464 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Infection, Genetics & Evolution
#17
of 80 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,366,233 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,466 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 419,464 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 80 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.