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Epidemiological surveillance of land borders in North and South America: a case study

Overview of attention for article published in Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de São Paulo, November 2017
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Title
Epidemiological surveillance of land borders in North and South America: a case study
Published in
Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de São Paulo, November 2017
DOI 10.1590/s1678-9946201759068
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robson Bruniera-Oliveira, Marco Aurélio Pereira Horta, Aiden Varan, Sonia Montiel, Eduardo Hage Carmo, Stephen H Waterman, José Fernando de Souza Verani

Abstract

This study aims to analyze the different binational/multinational activities, programs, and structures taking place on the borders of Brazil and the U.S. between 2013 and 2015. A descriptive exploratory study of two border epidemiological surveillance (BES) systems has been performed. Two approaches were used to collect data: i) technical visits to the facilities involved with border surveillance and application of a questionnaire survey; ii) application of an online questionnaire survey. It was identified that, for both surveillance systems, more than 55% of the technicians had realized that the BES and its activities have high priority. Eighty percent of North American and 71% of Brazilian border jurisdictions reported an exchange of information between countries. Less than half of the jurisdictions reported that the necessary tools to carry out information exchange were available. Operational attributes of completeness, feedback, reciprocity, and quality of information were identified as weak or of low quality in both systems. Statements, guidelines, and protocols to develop surveillance activities are available at the U.S.-Mexico border area. The continuous systematic development of surveillance systems at these borders will create more effective actions and responses.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 3 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 12%
Researcher 2 12%
Student > Postgraduate 2 12%
Student > Master 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Unknown 6 35%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 12%
Arts and Humanities 1 6%
Social Sciences 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Unknown 5 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 August 2018.
All research outputs
#15,384,661
of 17,407,080 outputs
Outputs from Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de São Paulo
#335
of 409 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#352,673
of 418,781 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de São Paulo
#3
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,407,080 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 409 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.8. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.