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Low VHL mRNA Expression is Associated with More Aggressive Tumor Features of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

Overview of attention for article published in PLOS ONE, December 2014
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2 tweeters

Citations

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22 Mendeley
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Title
Low VHL mRNA Expression is Associated with More Aggressive Tumor Features of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma
Published in
PLOS ONE, December 2014
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0114511
Pubmed ID
Authors

Boban Stanojevic, Vladimir Saenko, Lidija Todorovic, Nina Petrovic, Dragan Nikolic, Vladan Zivaljevic, Ivan Paunovic, Masahiro Nakashima, Shunichi Yamashita, Radan Dzodic

Abstract

Alterations of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor gene can cause different hereditary tumors associated with VHL syndrome, but the potential role of the VHL gene in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) has not been characterized. This study set out to investigate the relationship of VHL expression level with clinicopathological features of PTC in an ethnically and geographically homogenous group of 264 patients from Serbia, for the first time. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed a strong correlation between low level of VHL expression and advanced clinical stage (OR = 5.78, 95% CI 3.17-10.53, P<0.0001), classical papillary morphology of the tumor (OR = 2.92, 95% CI 1.33-6.44, P = 0.008) and multifocality (OR = 1.96, 95% CI 1.06-3.62, P = 0.031). In disease-free survival analysis, low VHL expression had marginal significance (P = 0.0502 by the log-rank test) but did not appear to be an independent predictor of the risk for chance of faster recurrence in a proportion hazards model. No somatic mutations or evidence of VHL downregulation via promoter hypermethylation in PTC were found. The results indicate that the decrease of VHL expression associates with tumor progression but the mechanism of downregulation remains to be elucidated.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 18%
Student > Master 4 18%
Other 3 14%
Professor 1 5%
Student > Bachelor 1 5%
Other 3 14%
Unknown 6 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 41%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 5%
Psychology 1 5%
Computer Science 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 8 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 December 2014.
All research outputs
#11,737,436
of 15,384,700 outputs
Outputs from PLOS ONE
#108,199
of 154,682 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#192,459
of 304,755 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLOS ONE
#1,714
of 2,391 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,384,700 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 154,682 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.9. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 2,391 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.