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Intercontinental genetic structure and gene flow in D unlin ( C alidris alpina ), a potential vector of avian influenza

Overview of attention for article published in Evolutionary Applications, January 2015
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Title
Intercontinental genetic structure and gene flow in D unlin ( C alidris alpina ), a potential vector of avian influenza
Published in
Evolutionary Applications, January 2015
DOI 10.1111/eva.12239
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mark P. Miller, Susan M. Haig, Thomas D. Mullins, Luzhang Ruan, Bruce Casler, Alexei Dondua, H. River Gates, J. Matthew Johnson, Steve Kendall, Pavel S. Tomkovich, Diane Tracy, Olga P. Valchuk, Richard B. Lanctot

Abstract

Waterfowl (Anseriformes) and shorebirds (Charadriiformes) are the most common wild vectors of influenza A viruses. Due to their migratory behavior, some may transmit disease over long distances. Migratory connectivity studies can link breeding and nonbreeding grounds while illustrating potential interactions among populations that may spread diseases. We investigated Dunlin (Calidris alpina), a shorebird with a subspecies (C. a. arcticola) that migrates from nonbreeding areas endemic to avian influenza in eastern Asia to breeding grounds in northern Alaska. Using microsatellites and mitochondrial DNA, we illustrate genetic structure among six subspecies: C. a. arcticola,C. a. pacifica,C. a. hudsonia,C. a. sakhalina,C. a. kistchinski, and C. a. actites. We demonstrate that mitochondrial DNA can help distinguish C. a. arcticola on the Asian nonbreeding grounds with >70% accuracy depending on their relative abundance, indicating that genetics can help determine whether C. a. arcticola occurs where they may be exposed to highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) during outbreaks. Our data reveal asymmetric intercontinental gene flow, with some C. a. arcticola short-stopping migration to breed with C. a. pacifica in western Alaska. Because C. a. pacifica migrates along the Pacific Coast of North America, interactions between these subspecies and other taxa provide route for transmission of HPAI into other parts of North America.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Unknown 44 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 27%
Other 6 13%
Student > Bachelor 5 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 11%
Professor 3 7%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 8 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 29 64%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 7%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 4%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 4%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 6 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 February 2015.
All research outputs
#12,206,587
of 16,016,051 outputs
Outputs from Evolutionary Applications
#920
of 1,091 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#194,654
of 307,408 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Evolutionary Applications
#27
of 31 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,016,051 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,091 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.5. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 307,408 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 31 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.