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Unfavorable impact of cancer cachexia on activity of daily living and need for inpatient care in elderly patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer in Japan: a prospective longitudinal…

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (73rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

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20 Dimensions

Readers on

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50 Mendeley
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Title
Unfavorable impact of cancer cachexia on activity of daily living and need for inpatient care in elderly patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer in Japan: a prospective longitudinal observational study
Published in
BMC Cancer, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12885-017-3795-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tateaki Naito, Taro Okayama, Takashi Aoyama, Takuya Ohashi, Yoshiyuki Masuda, Madoka Kimura, Hitomi Shiozaki, Haruyasu Murakami, Hirotsugu Kenmotsu, Tetsuhiko Taira, Akira Ono, Kazushige Wakuda, Hisao Imai, Takuya Oyakawa, Takeshi Ishii, Shota Omori, Kazuhisa Nakashima, Masahiro Endo, Katsuhiro Omae, Keita Mori, Nobuyuki Yamamoto, Akira Tanuma, Toshiaki Takahashi

Abstract

Cancer cachexia in elderly patients may substantially impact physical function and medical dependency. The aim of this study was to estimate the impact of cachexia on activity of daily living (ADL), length of hospital stay, and inpatient medical costs among elderly patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) receiving chemotherapy. Thirty patients aged ≥70 years with advanced NSCLC (stage III-IV) scheduled to receive first-line chemotherapy were prospectively enrolled between January 2013 and November 2014. ADL was assessed using the Barthel index. The disability-free survival time (DFS) was calculated as the time between the date of study entry and the date of onset of a disabling event, which was defined as a 10-point decrease in the Barthel index from that at baseline. The mean cumulative function of the length of hospital stay and inpatient medical costs (¥, Japanese yen) was calculated. The study patients comprised 11 women and 19 men, with a median age of 74 (range, 70-82) years. Cachexia was diagnosed in 19 (63%) patients. Cachectic patients had a shorter DFS (7.5 vs. 17.1 months, p < 0.05). During the first year from study entry, cachectic patients had longer cumulative lengths of hospital stay (80.7 vs. 38.5 days/person, p < 0.05), more frequent unplanned hospital visits or hospitalizations (4.2 vs. 1.7 times/person, p < 0.05), and higher inpatient medical costs (¥3.5 vs. ¥2.1 million/person, p < 0.05) than non-cachectic patients. Elderly NSCLC patients with cachexia showed higher risks for disability, prolonged hospitalizations, and higher inpatient medical costs while receiving chemotherapy than patients without cachexia. Our results might indicate that there is a potential need for an early intervention to minimize progression to or development of cachexia, improve functional prognosis, and reduce healthcare resource burden in this population. Trial registration number: UMIN000009768 . Name of registry: UMIN (University hospital Medical Information Network). Date of registration: 14 January 2013. Date of enrolment of the first participant to the trial: 23 January 2013.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 50 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 26%
Researcher 6 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 10%
Other 3 6%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 6%
Other 7 14%
Unknown 13 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 32%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 12%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 4%
Social Sciences 2 4%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 17 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 March 2020.
All research outputs
#4,805,822
of 15,364,807 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#1,308
of 5,768 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#144,313
of 408,218 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#126
of 510 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,364,807 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,768 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 408,218 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 510 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.