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Mosquitoes of eastern Amazonian Ecuador: biodiversity, bionomics and barcodes

Overview of attention for article published in Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, January 2013
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Title
Mosquitoes of eastern Amazonian Ecuador: biodiversity, bionomics and barcodes
Published in
Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, January 2013
DOI 10.1590/0074-0276130440
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yvonne-Marie Linton, James E Pecor, Charles H Porter, Luke Brett Mitchell, Andres Garzon-Moreno, Desmond H Foley, David Brooks Pecor, Richard C Wilkerson

Abstract

Two snapshot surveys to establish the diversity and ecological preferences of mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) in the terra firme primary rain forest surrounding the Tiputini Biodiversity Station in the UNESCO Yasuní Biosphere Reserve of eastern Amazonian Ecuador were carried out in November 1998 and May 1999. The mosquito fauna of this region is poorly known; the focus of this study was to obtain high quality link-reared specimens that could be used to unequivocally confirm species level diversity through integrated systematic study of all life stages and DNA sequences. A total of 2,284 specimens were preserved; 1,671 specimens were link-reared with associated immature exuviae, all but 108 of which are slide mounted. This study identified 68 unique taxa belonging to 17 genera and 27 subgenera. Of these, 12 are new to science and 37 comprise new country records. DNA barcodes [658-bp of the mtDNA cytochrome c oxidase (COI) I gene] are presented for 58 individuals representing 20 species and nine genera. DNA barcoding proved useful in uncovering and confirming new species and we advocate an integrated systematics approach to biodiversity studies in future. Associated bionomics of all species collected are discussed. An updated systematic checklist of the mosquitoes of Ecuador (n=179) is presented for the first time in 60 years.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 83 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Unknown 82 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 19 23%
Researcher 13 16%
Student > Bachelor 13 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 10%
Other 7 8%
Other 15 18%
Unknown 8 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 49 59%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 4 5%
Environmental Science 4 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 4%
Other 8 10%
Unknown 11 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 December 2014.
All research outputs
#15,312,760
of 22,774,233 outputs
Outputs from Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz
#903
of 1,376 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#181,744
of 280,966 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz
#13
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,774,233 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,376 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 280,966 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.