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Increased synovial lipodystrophy induced by high fat diet aggravates synovitis in experimental osteoarthritis

Overview of attention for article published in Arthritis Research & Therapy, December 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters
video
1 video uploader

Citations

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16 Dimensions

Readers on

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32 Mendeley
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Title
Increased synovial lipodystrophy induced by high fat diet aggravates synovitis in experimental osteoarthritis
Published in
Arthritis Research & Therapy, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13075-017-1473-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ane Larrañaga-Vera, Ana Lamuedra, Sandra Pérez-Baos, Ivan Prieto-Potin, Leticia Peña, Gabriel Herrero-Beaumont, Raquel Largo

Abstract

Metabolic syndrome (MetS) may be associated with knee osteoarthritis (OA), but the association between the individual components and OA are not well-understood. We aimed to study the effect of hypercholesterolemia on synovial inflammation in knee OA. OA was surgically induced in rabbits fed with standard diet (OA group, n = 10) or in rabbits fed with high fat diet (OA-HFD, n = 10). Healthy rabbits receiving standard diet (Control, n = 10) or fed with HFD (HFD, n = 6) were also monitored. Twelve weeks after OA induction, synovial membranes were isolated and processed for studies. Animals fed HFD showed higher levels of total serum cholesterol, triglycerides and C-reactive protein than control rabbits. Twelve weeks after OA induction, synovial membrane inflammation and macrophage infiltration were increased in rabbits with OA, particularly in the OA-HFD group. Extensive decrease of synovial adipose tissue area, adipocyte size and perilipin-1A synthesis were observed in the OA-HFD group in comparison to the OA and control groups. The HFD further increased the proinflammatory mediators IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF in the OA synovium. However, the synovial gene expression of adipokines, such as leptin and adiponectin, were markedly decreased in the rabbits with OA, especially in the OA-HFD group, in correlation with adipose tissue loss. However, circulating leptin was upregulated in the HFD and OA-HFD groups. Our results indicate that a HFD is an aggravating factor worsening synovial membrane inflammation during OA, guided by increased infiltration of macrophages and removal of the adipose tissue, together with a remarkable presence of proinflammatory factors. Synovial adipocytes and dyslipemia could probably play pivotal roles in OA joint deterioration in patients with MetS, supporting that the link between obesity and OA transcends mechanical loading.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 32 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 16%
Student > Master 5 16%
Student > Bachelor 3 9%
Researcher 3 9%
Professor 3 9%
Other 6 19%
Unknown 7 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 9%
Mathematics 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 11 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 December 2019.
All research outputs
#4,633,185
of 16,065,959 outputs
Outputs from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#1,080
of 2,470 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#131,387
of 412,714 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#85
of 206 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,065,959 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 71st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,470 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 412,714 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 206 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.