↓ Skip to main content

Assessing readiness for self-directed learning within a non-traditional nursing cohort

Overview of attention for article published in Nurse Education Today, March 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
27 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
148 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Assessing readiness for self-directed learning within a non-traditional nursing cohort
Published in
Nurse Education Today, March 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.nedt.2014.12.003
Pubmed ID
Authors

Brian N. Phillips, Beverley J. Turnbull, Flora X. He

Abstract

Increasing deregulation of the Australian tertiary system has led to changes in entry behaviours anticipated in non-traditional student cohorts. Many nursing students are returning to formal studies later in their lives seeking a career change. Accessibility and flexible study paths make external study increasingly attractive. However external studies require a level of commitment and willingness to develop self-direction and a capacity for resilience. This study sought to elicit the level of self-directed learning readiness (SDLR) among undergraduate nursing students currently enrolled at a bachelor level, and to elicit what differences existed in the levels of SDLR in relation to age, gender, academic year, and previous qualifications. An online survey questionnaire was utilised based on the Self-directed Learning Readiness Scale for Nursing Education. In contrast to earlier work, the participant profile in this study was predominantly non-traditional and captured participants from all three years of the nursing programme. Results found no significant age or gender differences. First year students demonstrated lower levels of self-directed learning readiness. However, unexpected results were demonstrated in the survey subscales in relation to previous qualifications. Participants who already held post-graduate qualifications showed lower scores for Self-Management than those who held diploma qualifications, while students who already held a bachelor's degree had the highest scores in Desire for Learning. The study findings suggest that universities should not assume that SDL capability is dependent on mature age or length of exposure to tertiary study.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 148 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 147 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 33 22%
Lecturer 23 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 11%
Student > Bachelor 11 7%
Researcher 9 6%
Other 35 24%
Unknown 20 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 36 24%
Social Sciences 24 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 23 16%
Psychology 8 5%
Computer Science 7 5%
Other 24 16%
Unknown 26 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 January 2015.
All research outputs
#6,306,808
of 12,010,397 outputs
Outputs from Nurse Education Today
#726
of 1,293 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#97,663
of 273,099 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nurse Education Today
#51
of 103 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,010,397 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,293 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.7. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,099 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 103 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.