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Baseline type 2 diabetes had a significant association with elevated high sensitivity cardiac troponin T levels in Chinese community-dwelling population: a 5-year prospective analysis

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrition & Metabolism, November 2017
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Title
Baseline type 2 diabetes had a significant association with elevated high sensitivity cardiac troponin T levels in Chinese community-dwelling population: a 5-year prospective analysis
Published in
Nutrition & Metabolism, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12986-017-0229-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shihui Fu, Rongjie Jin, Leiming Luo, Ping Ye

Abstract

The present analysis was designed to investigate the association of type 2 diabetes (T2D) with high sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) during the 5 years of follow-up, and explore which one of fasting blood glucose (FBG) and postprandial blood glucose (PBG) is a determinant of this association in Chinese community-dwelling population. This prospective community-based analysis was conducted based on 730 participants without coronary artery disease and hs-cTnT values ≥14 pg/mL receiving two measurements of hs-cTnT levels at baseline and follow-up of 5 years. Prevalence of T2D was 16.2% (118 participants). Median hs-cTnT levels were 4 (3-7) pg/mL and 6 (5-9) pg/mL at baseline and follow-up, respectively. The variation in hs-cTnT levels had a median of 2 (0-4) pg/ml (p < 0.001 for variation), and incidence of hs-cTnT levels ≥14 pg/ml was 7.1% (52 participants) at follow-up. T2D had a significant association with elevated hs-cTnT levels in multivariate Logistic regression models (p < 0.05). Elevated levels of PBG (p < 0.05) rather than FBG (p > 0.05) determined the significant association with elevated hs-cTnT levels in multivariate linear regression models. This community-based analysis observed that there was a significant increment of hs-cTnT levels, and baseline T2D had a significant association with elevated hs-cTnT levels during the 5 years of follow-up. Moreover, the present analysis demonstrated that PBG rather than FBG played a crucial role in this association in Chinese community-dwelling population without CAD.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 7 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 7 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Lecturer 1 14%
Student > Bachelor 1 14%
Other 1 14%
Researcher 1 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 14%
Other 2 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 71%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 14%
Unspecified 1 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 December 2017.
All research outputs
#10,864,977
of 12,259,388 outputs
Outputs from Nutrition & Metabolism
#579
of 624 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#284,445
of 342,744 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutrition & Metabolism
#19
of 23 outputs
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We're also able to compare this research output to 23 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.