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Dynamic changes in transcriptome and cell wall composition underlying brassinosteroid-mediated lignification of switchgrass suspension cells

Overview of attention for article published in Biotechnology for Biofuels, November 2017
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Title
Dynamic changes in transcriptome and cell wall composition underlying brassinosteroid-mediated lignification of switchgrass suspension cells
Published in
Biotechnology for Biofuels, November 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13068-017-0954-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Xiaolan Rao, Hui Shen, Sivakumar Pattathil, Michael G. Hahn, Ivana Gelineo-Albersheim, Debra Mohnen, Yunqiao Pu, Arthur J. Ragauskas, Xin Chen, Fang Chen, Richard A. Dixon

Abstract

Plant cell walls contribute the majority of plant biomass that can be used to produce transportation fuels. However, the complexity and variability in composition and structure of cell walls, particularly the presence of lignin, negatively impacts their deconstruction for bioenergy. Metabolic and genetic changes associated with secondary wall development in the biofuel crop switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) have yet to be reported. Our previous studies have established a cell suspension system for switchgrass, in which cell wall lignification can be induced by application of brassinolide (BL). We have now collected cell wall composition and microarray-based transcriptome profiles for BL-induced and non-induced suspension cultures to provide an overview of the dynamic changes in transcriptional reprogramming during BL-induced cell wall modification. From this analysis, we have identified changes in candidate genes involved in cell wall precursor synthesis, cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectin formation and ester-linkage generation. We have also identified a large number of transcription factors with expression correlated with lignin biosynthesis genes, among which are candidates for control of syringyl (S) lignin accumulation. Together, this work provides an overview of the dynamic compositional changes during brassinosteroid-induced cell wall remodeling, and identifies candidate genes for future plant genetic engineering to overcome cell wall recalcitrance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 41%
Professor 2 12%
Researcher 2 12%
Student > Bachelor 1 6%
Lecturer 1 6%
Other 4 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 53%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 24%
Unspecified 2 12%
Chemical Engineering 1 6%
Engineering 1 6%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 September 2018.
All research outputs
#10,796,075
of 13,565,336 outputs
Outputs from Biotechnology for Biofuels
#757
of 1,037 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#281,646
of 390,883 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biotechnology for Biofuels
#91
of 138 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,565,336 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,037 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 390,883 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 138 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.