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Are Measures Derived From Land Use and Transport Policies Associated With Walking for Transport?

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Physical Activity and Health, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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30 Mendeley
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Title
Are Measures Derived From Land Use and Transport Policies Associated With Walking for Transport?
Published in
Journal of Physical Activity and Health, January 2018
DOI 10.1123/jpah.2016-0693
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jerome N. Rachele, Vincent Learnihan, Hannah M. Badland, Suzanne Mavoa, Gavin Turrell, Billie Giles-Corti

Abstract

There is growing urgency for higher quality evidence to inform policy. This study developed geographic information systems (GIS) spatial measures based on land use and transport policies currently used in selected Australian states to assess which, if any, of these measures were associated with walking for transport. Overall, 6,901 participants from 570 neighbourhoods in Brisbane, Australia were included. Participants reported their minutes of walking for transport in the previous week. After a review of state-level land use and transport policies relevant to walking for transport across Australia, seven GIS measures were developed and tested based on nine relevant policies. Data were analysed using multilevel multinomial logistic regression. Greater levels of walking for transport were associated with more highly connected street networks, the presence of public transport stops and having at least two public transport services per hour. Conversely, neighbourhoods with shorter cul-de-sac lengths had lower levels of walking for transport. There was no evidence of associations between walking for transport and street block lengths less than 240m, or traffic volumes. These findings highlight the need for urban design and transport policies developed by governments to be assessed for their impact on transport-related physical activity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 23%
Student > Master 6 20%
Student > Postgraduate 3 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 7%
Professor 2 7%
Other 8 27%
Unknown 2 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 7 23%
Engineering 4 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 10%
Sports and Recreations 2 7%
Design 2 7%
Other 5 17%
Unknown 7 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 January 2018.
All research outputs
#6,991,845
of 12,387,983 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Physical Activity and Health
#358
of 676 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#162,263
of 357,774 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Physical Activity and Health
#9
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,387,983 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 676 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.8. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 357,774 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.