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Return of pandemic H1N1 influenza virus

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, December 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
18 Mendeley
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Title
Return of pandemic H1N1 influenza virus
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, December 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12879-014-0710-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hilda Sherbany, John McCauley, Tal Meningher, Musa Hindiyeh, Rita Dichtiar, Michal Perry Markovich, Ella Mendelson, Michal Mandelboim

Abstract

BackgroundInfluenza pandemics are usually caused by the re-assortment of several influenza viruses, results in the emergence of new influenza virus strains that can infect the entire population. These pandemic strains, as well as seasonal influenza viruses, are subjected to extensive antigenic change that has, so far, prevented the generation of a universal vaccine.MethodsSamples of patients hospitalized due to infection with the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus (A(H1N1)pdm09) from 2009, when the virus first appeared, until 2013 were analyzed.ResultsWhile many patients were hospitalized in 2009 due to infection with the pandemic H1N1 influenza virus, only small percentages of patients were hospitalized later in 2010¿2012. Surprisingly, however in 2012¿2013, we noticed that the percentages of patients hospitalized due to the pandemic H1N1 influenza infection increased significantly. Moreover, the ages of hospitalized patients differed throughout this entire period (2009¿2013) and pregnant women were especially vulnerable to the infection.ConclusionsHigh percentages of patients (especially pregnant women) were hospitalized in 2013 due to the A(H1N1)pdm09 infection, which may have been enabled by an antigenic drift from those which circulated at the onset of the pandemic.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 6%
Unknown 17 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 17%
Student > Bachelor 3 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 11%
Student > Master 1 6%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 4 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 28%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 3 17%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 6%
Other 2 11%
Unknown 4 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 January 2015.
All research outputs
#7,679,881
of 14,265,732 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#2,024
of 5,307 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#114,423
of 297,678 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#246
of 634 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,265,732 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,307 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 297,678 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 634 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.