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Diversification of defensins and NLRs in Arabidopsis species by different evolutionary mechanisms

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, December 2017
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

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10 tweeters

Citations

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51 Mendeley
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Title
Diversification of defensins and NLRs in Arabidopsis species by different evolutionary mechanisms
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12862-017-1099-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mariana Mondragón-Palomino, Remco Stam, Ajay John-Arputharaj, Thomas Dresselhaus

Abstract

Genes encoding proteins underlying host-pathogen co-evolution and which are selected for new resistance specificities frequently are under positive selection, a process that maintains diversity. Here, we tested the contribution of natural selection, recombination and transcriptional divergence to the evolutionary diversification of the plant defensins superfamily in three Arabidopsis species. The intracellular NOD-like receptor (NLR) family was used for comparison because positive selection has been well documented in its members. Similar to defensins, NLRs are encoded by a large and polymorphic gene family and many of their members are involved in the immune response. Gene trees of Arabidopsis defensins (DEFLs) show a high prevalence of clades containing orthologs. This indicates that their diversity dates back to a common ancestor and species-specific duplications did not significantly contribute to gene family expansion. DEFLs are characterized by a pervasive pattern of neutral evolution with infrequent positive and negative selection as well as recombination. In comparison, most NLR alignment groups are characterized by frequent occurrence of positive selection and recombination in their leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain as well negative selection in their nucleotide-binding (NB-ARC) domain. While major NLR subgroups are expressed in pistils and leaves both in presence or absence of pathogen infection, the members of DEFL alignment groups are predominantly transcribed in pistils. Furthermore, conserved groups of NLRs and DEFLs are differentially expressed in response to Fusarium graminearum regardless of whether these genes are under positive selection or not. The present analyses of NLRs expands previous studies in Arabidopsis thaliana and highlights contrasting patterns of purifying and diversifying selection affecting different gene regions. DEFL genes show a different evolutionary trend, with fewer recombination events and significantly fewer instances of natural selection. Their heterogeneous expression pattern suggests that transcriptional divergence probably made the major contribution to functional diversification. In comparison to smaller families encoding pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins under positive selection, DEFLs are involved in a wide variety of processes that altogether might pose structural and functional trade-offs to their family-wide pattern of evolution.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 51 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 20%
Student > Bachelor 5 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 8%
Student > Postgraduate 4 8%
Other 7 14%
Unknown 10 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 41%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 25%
Environmental Science 1 2%
Unspecified 1 2%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 2%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 14 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 March 2018.
All research outputs
#3,304,430
of 13,524,702 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#985
of 2,513 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#107,601
of 387,338 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#124
of 240 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,524,702 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,513 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 387,338 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 240 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.