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Variations in the number of births by day of the week, and morbidity and mortality in very-low-birth-weight infants

Overview of attention for article published in Jornal de Pediatria, January 2019
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (54th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

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3 tweeters

Readers on

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26 Mendeley
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Title
Variations in the number of births by day of the week, and morbidity and mortality in very-low-birth-weight infants
Published in
Jornal de Pediatria, January 2019
DOI 10.1016/j.jped.2017.10.006
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fermín García-Muñoz Rodrigo, Loida García Cruz, Gloria Galán Henríquez, Lourdes Urquía Martí, Sonia Rivero Rodríguez, Alfredo García-Alix, Josep Figueras Aloy

Abstract

To know the distribution of births of very low birth weight infants by day of the week, and whether this distribution affects the morbidity and mortality in this group of patients. This was a retrospective analysis of data collected prospectively in the Spanish SEN1500 network (2002-2011). Outborn infants, patients with major congenital anomalies, and those who died in the delivery room were excluded. Births were grouped into "weekdays" and "weekends." A multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted to evaluate the independent effect of the birth moment on outcomes, and Cox regression for survival. Out of a total of 27,205 very low birth weight infants born at and/or admitted to the participating centers, 22,961 (84.4%) met inclusion criteria. A reduction of 24% in the number of births was observed during the "weekends" compared with "weekdays". In the raw analysis, patients born on weekends exhibited higher morbidity and mortality (mortality rate: 14.2% vs. 16.5%, p<0.001), but differences were no longer significant after adjusting for confounding factors. The present results suggest that current care practices reduce the proportion of births during the weekends and tend to cluster some high-risk births during this period, increasing crude morbidity and mortality. However, after adjusting for confounding factors, the differences disappear, suggesting that overall care coverage in these centers is appropriate.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 23%
Student > Postgraduate 3 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 8%
Student > Bachelor 2 8%
Other 2 8%
Other 3 12%
Unknown 8 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 7 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 23%
Decision Sciences 1 4%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 4%
Social Sciences 1 4%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 8 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 December 2017.
All research outputs
#6,905,783
of 12,440,542 outputs
Outputs from Jornal de Pediatria
#154
of 417 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#141,258
of 323,110 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Jornal de Pediatria
#3
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,440,542 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 417 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 323,110 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.