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Enteral vitamin A for reducing severity of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in extremely preterm infants: a randomised controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pediatrics, December 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (54th percentile)

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Citations

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108 Mendeley
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Title
Enteral vitamin A for reducing severity of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in extremely preterm infants: a randomised controlled trial
Published in
BMC Pediatrics, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12887-017-0958-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Abhijeet Rakshasbhuvankar, Sanjay Patole, Karen Simmer, J. Jane Pillow

Abstract

Intramuscular vitamin A supplementation decreases the risk of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in very-low-birth-weight preterm infants without significant adverse effects. However, intramuscular vitamin A supplementation is not widely accepted because of the discomfort and risk of trauma associated with repeated injections. Enteral vitamin A supplementation has not been studied adequately in the clinical trials. Enterally administered water-soluble vitamin A is absorbed better than the fat-soluble form. We hypothesised that enteral administration of a water-soluble vitamin A preparation will decrease severity of BPD compared with a control group receiving placebo. We plan a double-blind randomised placebo-controlled trial at a tertiary neonatal-perinatal intensive care unit. Eligibility criteria include infants born at less than 28 weeks' gestational age and less than 72 h of life. Infants with major congenital gastrointestinal or respiratory tract abnormalities will be excluded. After parental consent, infants will be randomized to receive either enteral water-soluble vitamin A (5000 IU once a day) or placebo. The intervention will be started within 24 h of introduction of feeds and continued until 34 weeks' post-menstrual age (PMA). The primary outcome is severity of BPD at 36 weeks' PMA. Severity of BPD will be assessed objectively from the right-shift of the peripheral oxyhaemoglobin saturation versus partial pressure of inspired oxygen (SpO2-PiO2) curve. We require 188 infants for 80% power and 5% significance level based on an expected 20% decrease in the right shift of the SpO2-PiO2 curve in the vitamin A group (primary outcome) compared with control group at 36 weeks' PMA, and a 20% attrition rate. Secondary outcomes will be plasma and salivary concentrations of vitamin A on day 28 of the trial (first 30 infants), lung and diaphragm function, clinical outcomes at 36 week' PMA or before discharge/death, and safety of vitamin A. BPD poses a significant economic burden on the health-care system. If our study shows that enteral supplementation of water-soluble vitamin A is safe and effective for decreasing the severity of BPD, it will provide the opportunity to further evaluate a simple, globally acceptable preventive therapy for BPD. ANZCTR; ACTRN12616000408482 (30th March 2016).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 108 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 108 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 17 16%
Student > Master 14 13%
Student > Postgraduate 8 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 7%
Student > Bachelor 7 6%
Other 16 15%
Unknown 38 35%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 34 31%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 8%
Psychology 4 4%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 2%
Other 10 9%
Unknown 46 43%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 December 2017.
All research outputs
#7,081,344
of 12,319,220 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pediatrics
#844
of 1,433 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#165,150
of 346,238 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pediatrics
#29
of 64 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,319,220 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,433 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 346,238 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 64 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.