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Clinicopathologic study of intestinal spirochetosis in Japan with special reference to human immunodeficiency virus infection status and species types: analysis of 5265 consecutive colorectal biopsies

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, January 2015
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Title
Clinicopathologic study of intestinal spirochetosis in Japan with special reference to human immunodeficiency virus infection status and species types: analysis of 5265 consecutive colorectal biopsies
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, January 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12879-014-0736-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yoko Tateishi, Masae Takahashi, Shin-ichiro Horiguchi, Nobuaki Funata, Koichi Koizumi, Koji Okudela, Tsunekazu Hishima, Kenichi Ohashi

Abstract

BackgroundPrevious studies reported that the incidence of intestinal spirochetosis was high in homosexual men, especially those with Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection. The aim of the present study was to clarify the clinicopathological features of intestinal spirochetosis in Japan with special reference to Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection status and species types.MethodsA pathology database search for intestinal spirochetosis was performed at Tokyo Metropolitan Cancer and Infectious Disease Center Komagome Hospital between January 2008 and October 2011, and included 5265 consecutive colorectal biopsies from 4254 patients. After patient identification, a retrospective review of endoscopic records and clinical information was performed. All pathology slides were reviewed by two pathologists. The length of the spirochetes was measured using a digital microscope. Causative species were identified by polymerase chain reaction.ResultsIntestinal spirochetosis was diagnosed in 3 out of 55 Human Immunodeficiency Virus-positive patients (5.5%). The mean length of intestinal spirochetes was 8.5 ¿m (range 7¿11). Brachyspira pilosicoli was detected by polymerase chain reaction in all 3 patients. Intestinal spirochetosis was also diagnosed in 73 out of 4199 Human Immunodeficiency Virus-negative patients (1.7%).¿ The mean length of intestinal spirochetes was 3.5 ¿m (range 2¿8). The species of intestinal spirochetosis was identified by polymerase chain reaction in 31 Human Immunodeficiency Virus-negative patients. Brachyspira aalborgi was detected in 24 cases (78%) and Brachyspira pilosicoli in 6 cases (19%). Both Brachyspira aalborgi and Brachyspira pilosicoli were detected in only one Human Immunodeficiency Virus-negative patient (3%). The mean length of Brachyspira aalborgi was 3.8 ¿m, while that of Brachyspira pilosicoli was 5.5 ¿m. The length of Brachyspira pilosicoli was significantly longer than that of Brachyspira aalborgi (p¿<¿0.01). The lengths of intestinal spirochetes were significantly longer in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-positive patients than in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-negative patients (p¿<¿0.05).ConclusionsThe incidence of intestinal spirochetosis was slightly higher in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-positive patients than in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-negative patients. However, no relationship was found between the Human Immunodeficiency Virus status and intestinal spirochetosis in Japan. Brachyspira pilosicoli infection may be more common in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-positive patients with intestinal spirochetosis than in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-negative patients with intestinal spirochetosis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 1 5%
Unknown 21 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 6 27%
Student > Master 3 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 14%
Professor 2 9%
Student > Bachelor 2 9%
Other 5 23%
Unknown 1 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 45%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 5%
Other 3 14%
Unknown 2 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 January 2015.
All research outputs
#3,266,295
of 4,739,474 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1,785
of 2,567 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#109,758
of 159,958 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#113
of 181 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,739,474 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,567 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.9. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 181 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.