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Surveillance for and Discovery of Borrelia Species in US Patients Suspected of Tickborne Illness

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Infectious Diseases, December 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
24 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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15 Mendeley
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Title
Surveillance for and Discovery of Borrelia Species in US Patients Suspected of Tickborne Illness
Published in
Clinical Infectious Diseases, December 2017
DOI 10.1093/cid/cix1107
Pubmed ID
Authors

Luke C Kingry, Melissa Anacker, Bobbi Pritt, Jenna Bjork, Laurel Respicio-Kingry, Gongping Liu, Sarah Sheldon, David Boxrud, Anna Strain, Stephanie Oatman, Jon Berry, Lynne Sloan, Paul Mead, David Neitzel, Kiersten J Kugeler, Jeannine M Petersen

Abstract

Tick-transmitted Borrelia species fall into two heterogeneous bacterial complexes comprised of multiple species, the relapsing fever (RF) group and the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato group, which are the causative agents of Lyme borreliosis (LB), the most common tickborne disease in the northern hemisphere. Geographic expansion of human LB in the United States and discovery of emerging Borrelia pathogens underscores the importance of surveillance for disease causing Borrelia. De-identified clinical specimens, submitted by providers throughout the United States, for patients suspected of LB, anaplasmosis, ehrlichiosis, or babesiosis, were screened using a Borrelia genus level TaqMan PCR. Borrelia species and sequence types (STs) were characterized by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) utilizing next generation sequencing. Among the 7,292 tested specimens tested, five different Borrelia species were identified: two causing LB, B. burgdorferi (n=25) and B. mayonii (n=9), and three RF borreliae, B. hermsii (n=1), B. miyamotoi (n=8), and CandidatusB. johnsonii (n=1), a species previously detected only in the bat tick, Carios kelleyi. ST diversity was greatest for B. burgdorferi positive specimens, with new STs identified primarily among synovial fluids. These results demonstrate broad PCR screening followed by MLST is a powerful surveillance tool for uncovering the spectrum of Borrelia species causing human disease, improving understanding of their geographic distribution, and investigating the correlation between B. burgdorferi STs and joint involvement. Detection of CandidatusB. johnsonii in a patient with suspected tickborne disease suggests this species may be a previously undetected cause of illness in humans with exposure to bat ticks.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 24 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 6 40%
Researcher 4 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 13%
Student > Master 1 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 7 47%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 13%
Social Sciences 1 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 7%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 35. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 June 2018.
All research outputs
#455,923
of 13,157,264 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Infectious Diseases
#656
of 10,772 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#22,239
of 383,995 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Infectious Diseases
#32
of 176 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,157,264 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,772 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 383,995 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 176 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.