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The role of the mussel Mytilus spp. in the transmission of ostreid herpesvirus-1 microVar

Overview of attention for article published in Parasitology, December 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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25 Mendeley
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Title
The role of the mussel Mytilus spp. in the transmission of ostreid herpesvirus-1 microVar
Published in
Parasitology, December 2017
DOI 10.1017/s0031182017002244
Pubmed ID
Authors

A. J. O’ Reilly, C. Laide, A Maloy, S. Hutton, B. Bookelaar, K. O’ Sullivan, S. A. Lynch, S. C. Culloty

Abstract

The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas contributes significantly to global aquaculture; however, C. gigas culture has been affected by ostreid herpesvirus-1 (OsHV-1) and variants. The dynamics of how the virus maintains itself at culture sites is unclear and the role of carriers, reservoirs or hosts is unknown. Both wild and cultured mussels Mytilus spp. (Mytilus edulis, Mytilus galloprovincialis and hybrids) are commonly found at C. gigas culture sites. The objective of this study was to investigate if Mytilus spp. can harbour the virus and if viral transmission can occur between mussels and oysters. Mytilus spp. living at oyster trestles, 400-500 m higher up the shore from the trestles and up to 26 km at non-culture sites were screened for OsHV-1 and variants by all the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) recommended diagnostic methods including polymerase chain reaction (PCR), quantitative PCR (qPCR), histology, in situ hybridization and confirmation using direct sequencing. The particular primers that target OsHV-1 and variants, including OsHV-1 microVar (μVar), were used in the PCR and qPCR. OsHV-1 μVar was detected in wild Mytilus spp. at C. gigas culture sites and more significantly the virus was detected in mussels at non-culture sites. Cohabitation of exposed wild mussels and naïve C. gigas resulted in viral transmission after 14 days, under an elevated temperature regime. These results indicate that mussels can harbour OsHV-1 μVar; however, the impact of OsHV-1 μVar on Mytilus spp. requires further investigation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 20%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 4%
Student > Bachelor 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Other 4 16%
Unknown 6 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 24%
Environmental Science 5 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 16%
Unspecified 1 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 4%
Other 3 12%
Unknown 5 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 April 2019.
All research outputs
#7,765,254
of 14,619,233 outputs
Outputs from Parasitology
#1,184
of 1,940 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#165,935
of 399,515 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasitology
#20
of 32 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,619,233 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,940 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 399,515 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 32 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.