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Adolescent Coordinated Transition (ACT) to improve health outcomes among young people living with HIV in Nigeria: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in Trials, December 2017
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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150 Mendeley
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Title
Adolescent Coordinated Transition (ACT) to improve health outcomes among young people living with HIV in Nigeria: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial
Published in
Trials, December 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13063-017-2347-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nadia A. Sam-Agudu, Jennifer R. Pharr, Tamara Bruno, Chad L. Cross, Llewellyn J. Cornelius, Prosper Okonkwo, Bolanle Oyeledun, Hadiza Khamofu, Ayodotun Olutola, Salome Erekaha, William Nii Ayitey Menson, Echezona E. Ezeanolue

Abstract

Adolescents living with HIV (ALHIV) have worse health outcomes than other populations of people living with HIV. Contributing factors include lack of standard and comprehensive procedures for ALHIV transitioning from pediatric to adult care. This has contributed to poor retention at, and following transition, which is problematic especially in high ALHIV-burden, resource-limited settings like Nigeria. Using a two-arm cluster randomized control design, the Adolescent Coordinated Transition (ACT) trial will measure the comparative effectiveness of a graduated transition and organized support group intervention against the usual practice of abrupt transfer of Nigerian ALHIV from pediatric to adult care. This study will be conducted at 12 secondary and tertiary healthcare facilities (six intervention, six control) across all six of Nigeria's geopolitical zones. The study population is 13- to 17-year-old ALHIV (N = 216, n = 108 per study arm) on antiretroviral therapy. Study participants will be followed through a 12-month pre-transfer/transition period and for an additional 24 months post transfer/transition. The primary outcome measure is the proportion of ALHIV retained in care at 12 and 24 months post transfer. Secondary outcome measures are proportions of ALHIV achieving viral suppression and demonstrating increased psychosocial wellbeing and self-efficacy measured by psychometric tests including health locus of control, functional social support, perceived mental health, and sexual risk and behavior. We hypothesize that the ACT intervention will significantly increase psychosocial wellbeing, retention in care and ultimately viral suppression among ALHIV. ACT's findings have the potential to facilitate the development of standard guidelines for transitioning ALHIV and improving health outcomes in this population. The engagement of a consortium of local implementing partners under the Nigeria Implementation Science Alliance allows for nationwide study implementation and expedient results dissemination to program managers and policy-makers. Ultimately, ACT may also provide evidence to inform transitioning guidelines not only for ALHIV but for adolescents living with other chronic diseases in resource-limited settings. ClinicalTrials.gov, ID: NCT03152006 . Registered on May 12, 2017.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 150 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 150 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 30 20%
Researcher 29 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 7%
Student > Bachelor 10 7%
Other 22 15%
Unknown 32 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 31 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 27 18%
Social Sciences 17 11%
Psychology 12 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 3%
Other 16 11%
Unknown 43 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 January 2018.
All research outputs
#8,550,293
of 14,203,209 outputs
Outputs from Trials
#2,436
of 3,711 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#209,646
of 397,857 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Trials
#290
of 463 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,203,209 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,711 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.7. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 397,857 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 463 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.