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Recovery of a freshwater wetland from chemical contamination after an oil spill

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Environmental Monitoring, January 2011
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16 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
Title
Recovery of a freshwater wetland from chemical contamination after an oil spill
Published in
Journal of Environmental Monitoring, January 2011
DOI 10.1039/c0em00406e
Pubmed ID
Authors

Haipu Bi, David Rissik, Miroslava Macova, Laurence Hearn, Jochen F. Mueller, Beate Escher

Abstract

In March 2009, a cargo ship spilled 250 tons of heavy fuel oil off the Queensland coast of Australia. The pristine National Park Moreton Island, seven nautical miles to the east of the spill site, was most affected by the oil slick. Contamination of the island's shoreline was widespread, with freshwater wetlands particularly slow to recover as clean-up needed to be carefully managed to avoid damage to this sensitive ecosystem. During the clean-up process on Moreton Island a monitoring program was initiated using traditional chemical analysis in combination with bioanalytical techniques to assess the extent and variability in contamination at sites on the shoreline and freshwater wetlands. Water accommodated fractions (WAF) of oil residues from samples taken directly after the spill on the shoreline showed the same level of toxic potency as samples from the wetland while baseline-toxicity equivalent concentrations (baseline-TEQ) and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin equivalent concentrations (TCDDEQ) were much lower in oil collected from the sandy beach. The umuC assay for genotoxicity and the E-SCREEN assay for estrogenic effects indicated the extracts were not genotoxic or estrogenic. PAH concentrations and toxicity in grab water samples were below detectable levels, however, extracts from time integrated silicone passive samplers deployed for several weeks at the contaminated sites gave measurable responses in the bioassays with TCDDEQ levels increased relative to the control site. The low levels of baseline-TEQ and TCDDEQ present after 8 months had further decreased 6 months later indicating satisfactory recovery of this pristine ecosystem after an oil spill.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 13%
South Africa 1 6%
Unknown 13 81%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 38%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 19%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 13%
Student > Bachelor 2 13%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 6%
Other 2 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 6 38%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 25%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 19%
Unspecified 2 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 6%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 January 2015.
All research outputs
#10,942,099
of 12,347,317 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Environmental Monitoring
#471
of 507 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#216,606
of 266,560 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Environmental Monitoring
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,347,317 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 507 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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