↓ Skip to main content

Human leukocyte antigen class I and class II alleles are associated with susceptibility and resistance in borderline leprosy patients from Southeast Brazil

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, January 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
26 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Human leukocyte antigen class I and class II alleles are associated with susceptibility and resistance in borderline leprosy patients from Southeast Brazil
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, January 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12879-015-0751-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fabiana Covolo de Souza-Santana, Elaine Valim Camarinha Marcos, Maria Esther Salles Nogueira, Somei Ura, Jane Tomimori

Abstract

BackgroundEvidence suggests that human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles influence the host immune response against Mycobacterium leprae. However, the association between HLA alleles and borderline (B) leprosy has not been studied. The aim of this study was to determine whether HLA class I and II molecules are associated with susceptibility or resistance to B leprosy including borderline-tuberculoid (BT), borderline-borderline (BB), and borderline-lepromatous (BL).MethodsDNA was obtained by the salting-out technique from the blood samples of 202 patients with B leprosy and 478 control subjects. HLA class I (A*, B*, and C* loci) and class II (DRB1* and DQB1* loci) genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction amplification and reverse hybridization with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes and sequence-specific primers.ResultsThe case-controlled analysis results showed a significant association between B leprosy and HLA-C*05 (5.94% vs. 14.02%; p¿=¿0.002, OR¿=¿0.38, 95%CI¿=¿0.20¿0.73, pc¿=¿0.032) and HLA-DRB1*07 (16.34% vs. 26.77%; p¿=¿0.003, OR¿=¿0.53, 95%CI¿=¿0.3¿0.8, pc¿=¿0.039). A protective association was observed between BL leprosy and HLA-DQB1*02 (18.18% vs. 39.53%; p¿=¿0.005, OR¿=¿0.34, 95%CI¿=¿0.15¿0.75, pc¿=¿0.025). In reactional patients, a significant association was observed between HLA-B*15 (28.72% vs. 12.76%; p¿=¿0.011, OR¿=¿2.75, 95%CI¿=¿1.30¿5.85, pc¿=¿0.352) and predisposition to reversal reaction. Haplotype analysis showed that A*02-B*07-C*07-DRB1*15-DQB1*06 (2.97% vs. 1.04%; p¿=¿0.015) and A*02-B*40-C*03-DRB1*13-DQB1*06 (1.73% vs. 0.10%; p¿=¿0.0011) were associated with susceptibility to the B form. The presence of the HLA-DRB1*02 or HLA-DRB1*03/HLA-DQB1*01 haplotypes in B patients (22.05% vs. 33.0%; p¿=¿0.005) suggested the involvement of these haplotypes in this clinical form of the disease.ConclusionsThe results indicate the involvement of HLA class I and class II molecules in B leprosy and reversal reactions; it also suggest a role for HLA in polarization of the disease in this group of patients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 23%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 23%
Student > Master 4 15%
Student > Bachelor 3 12%
Unspecified 3 12%
Other 4 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 35%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 31%
Unspecified 4 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 12%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 4%
Other 1 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 January 2015.
All research outputs
#3,105,378
of 4,771,283 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1,581
of 2,567 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#102,844
of 159,584 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#89
of 171 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,771,283 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,567 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.9. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 159,584 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 171 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.