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White Matter Changes Related to Subconcussive Impact Frequency during a Single Season of High School Football

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Neuroradiology, December 2017
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (77th percentile)

Mentioned by

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11 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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27 Mendeley
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Title
White Matter Changes Related to Subconcussive Impact Frequency during a Single Season of High School Football
Published in
American Journal of Neuroradiology, December 2017
DOI 10.3174/ajnr.a5489
Pubmed ID
Authors

S.J. Kuzminski, M.D. Clark, M.A. Fraser, C.C. Haswell, R.A. Morey, C. Liu, K.R. Choudhury, K.M. Guskiewicz, J.R. Petrella

Abstract

The effect of exposing the developing brain of a high school football player to subconcussive impacts during a single season is unknown. The purpose of this pilot study was to use diffusion tensor imaging to assess white matter changes during a single high school football season, and to correlate these changes with impacts measured by helmet accelerometer data and neurocognitive test scores collected during the same period. Seventeen male athletes (mean age, 16 ± 0.73 years) underwent MR imaging before and after the season. Changes in fractional anisotropy across the white matter skeleton were assessed with Tract-Based Spatial Statistics and ROI analysis. The mean number of impacts over a 10-g threshold sustained was 414 ± 291. Voxelwise analysis failed to show significant changes in fractional anisotropy across the season or a correlation with impact frequency, after correcting for multiple comparisons. ROI analysis showed significant (P < .05, corrected) decreases in fractional anisotropy in the fornix-stria terminalis and cingulum hippocampus, which were related to impact frequency. The effects were strongest in the fornix-stria terminalis, where decreases in fractional anisotropy correlated with worsening visual memory. Our findings suggest that subclinical neurotrauma related to participation in American football may result in white matter injury and that alterations in white matter tracts within the limbic system may be detectable after only 1 season of play at the high school level.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 27 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 22%
Student > Master 4 15%
Unspecified 3 11%
Student > Postgraduate 3 11%
Student > Bachelor 3 11%
Other 8 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 6 22%
Neuroscience 6 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 22%
Sports and Recreations 3 11%
Psychology 3 11%
Other 3 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 July 2019.
All research outputs
#2,192,865
of 13,583,919 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Neuroradiology
#484
of 3,414 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#85,056
of 389,581 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Neuroradiology
#23
of 102 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,583,919 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,414 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 389,581 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 102 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.