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Functioning in early and late stages of schizophrenia

Overview of attention for article published in Trends in Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, December 2014
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Title
Functioning in early and late stages of schizophrenia
Published in
Trends in Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, December 2014
DOI 10.1590/2237-6089-2014-0028
Pubmed ID
Authors

Leonardo Gazzi Costa, Raffael Massuda, Mariana Pedrini, Ives Cavalcante Passos, Leticia Sanguinetti Czepielewski, Elisa Brietzke, Clarissa S. Gama

Abstract

Schizophrenia is frequently associated with a debilitating course and prominent impairment in social and occupational functioning. Although the criteria for classification into stages have not been defined in the literature, illness duration and functioning seem to be good candidates. To compare functioning of patients with schizophrenia at different stages of the disease (early vs. late) and healthy sex- and age-matched controls. This double-blinded, case-controlled study included 79 individuals: 23 patients with schizophrenia diagnosed up to 5 years earlier; 19 patients with schizophrenia diagnosed at least 20 years earlier; and healthy matched controls. Diagnoses were established using the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV) Axis I Disorder. Functioning was assessed using the Functioning Assessment Short Test (FAST). Patients in the early stage had significantly higher scores than healthy controls in total FAST and in autonomy, occupational functioning, cognitive functioning and interpersonal relationships. Individuals in the late stage had significantly poorer functioning than controls in all domains. The comparison of functioning between the two groups of patients revealed no significant differences, except in occupational functioning, in which late stage patients had a poorer performance. Functioning impairment in schizophrenia tends to remain stable despite illness duration. Therefore, functioning should be effectively assessed at an early stage, as illness duration alone may not be the most reliable criterion to stage patients with schizophrenia.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 1 4%
Student > Postgraduate 1 4%
Unknown 23 92%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 1 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 4%
Unknown 23 92%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 January 2015.
All research outputs
#10,032,421
of 12,538,502 outputs
Outputs from Trends in Psychiatry and Psychotherapy
#43
of 72 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#184,198
of 272,720 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Trends in Psychiatry and Psychotherapy
#2
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,538,502 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 72 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.8. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,720 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.