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How to fit allergen immunotherapy in the elderly

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical and Molecular Allergy, October 2017
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1 tweeter

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4 Dimensions

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8 Mendeley
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Title
How to fit allergen immunotherapy in the elderly
Published in
Clinical and Molecular Allergy, October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12948-017-0075-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Erminia Ridolo, Anti Rogkakou, Maria Teresa Ventura, Irene Martignago, Cristoforo Incorvaia, Gabriele Lorenzo, Giovanni Passalacqua

Abstract

Asthma, allergic rhinitis (AR) and atopic dermatitis are very common in young people, but in the latest decades it was increasingly recognized that also individuals of higher ages, including the population over 65 years, are concerned. Actually, it is now acknowledged the aging does not considerably alter the immune response to allergens. Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is the only treatment that works on the causes of allergy, but elderly people are commonly excluded from AIT, except the cases of insect sting allergy. A number of recent studies showed that aged individuals also successfully respond to AIT for respiratory allergy. Therefore, there is no reason to exclude elder patients from AIT. Anyhow, clinical conditions that are considered absolute or relative contraindications are quite frequent in this aged population, thus the risk/benefit ratio must be carefully evaluated for each patient, taking into account that the more frequent occurrence of co-morbidities and the consequent need of daily-based multidrug regimen can favor adverse effects. An important issue concern the ability of AIT, and particularly of sublingual immunotherapy, to significantly improve the quality of life, that often is particularly impaired in the elderly, reducing symptoms and drugs consumption.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 8 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 8 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 3 38%
Student > Master 2 25%
Librarian 1 13%
Other 1 13%
Student > Postgraduate 1 13%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 63%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 13%
Computer Science 1 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 December 2017.
All research outputs
#7,726,034
of 12,363,980 outputs
Outputs from Clinical and Molecular Allergy
#76
of 119 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#195,691
of 350,280 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical and Molecular Allergy
#9
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,363,980 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 119 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 350,280 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.