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An educational program for insulin self-adjustment associated with structured self-monitoring of blood glucose significantly improves glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus after…

Overview of attention for article published in Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome, January 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (63rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

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51 Mendeley
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Title
An educational program for insulin self-adjustment associated with structured self-monitoring of blood glucose significantly improves glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus after 12 weeks: a randomized, controlled pilot study
Published in
Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome, January 2015
DOI 10.1186/1758-5996-7-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daniel Dutra Romualdo Silva, Adriana Aparecida Bosco

Abstract

Self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) has been recommended as a useful tool for improving glycemic control, but is still an underutilized strategy and most diabetic patients are not aware of the actions that must be taken in response to its results and do not adjust their treatment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of an educational program for insulin self-adjustment based on SMBG in poorly controlled patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). A prospective, randomized, controlled 12-week intervention study was conducted on poorly controlled insulin-requiring patients with T2DM. Twenty-three subjects were randomized to two educational programs: a 2-week basic program with guidance about SMBG and types and techniques of insulin administration (group A, n = 12) and a 6-week program including the basic one and additional instructions about self-titration of insulin doses according to a specific protocol (group B, n = 11). Patients were reviewed after 12 weeks and baseline to endpoint changes in glycated hemoglobin (A1C), insulin doses, body weight and incidence of hypoglycemia were compared by paired and independent Student t-tests. After 12 weeks, there was a significant reduction in A1C only in group B, but group comparison showed no significant difference (p = 0.051). A higher percentage of subjects in group B achieved an A1C near the treatment target (<7.5%) than in group A. Daily insulin dose increased non-significantly in the two groups and there was no significant difference in the incidence of hypoglycemia or body weight changes between groups. Training for self-titrating insulin doses combined with structured SMBG can safely improve glycemic control in poorly controlled insulin-treated T2DM patients. This strategy may facilitate effective insulin therapy in routine medical practice, compensating for any reluctance on the part of physicians to optimize insulin therapy and thus to improve the achievement of recommended targets of diabetes care.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 50 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 16%
Researcher 8 16%
Student > Bachelor 7 14%
Professor 3 6%
Other 6 12%
Unknown 2 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 31%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 7 14%
Psychology 7 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 12%
Computer Science 3 6%
Other 8 16%
Unknown 4 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 January 2015.
All research outputs
#2,026,396
of 4,683,775 outputs
Outputs from Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome
#71
of 216 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#63,742
of 161,577 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome
#13
of 38 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,683,775 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 55th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 216 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 161,577 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 38 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.