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International inter-school competition to encourage children to walk to school: a mixed methods feasibility study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, January 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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29 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

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75 Mendeley
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Title
International inter-school competition to encourage children to walk to school: a mixed methods feasibility study
Published in
BMC Research Notes, January 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13104-014-0959-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ruth F Hunter, Debra de Silva, Veronica Reynolds, William Bird, Kenneth R Fox

Abstract

BackgroundActive travel to school can be an important contributor to the total physical activity of children but levels have declined and more novel approaches are required to stimulate this as an habitual behaviour. The aim of this mixed methods study was to investigate the feasibility of an international walk to school competition supported by novel swipecard technology to increase children¿s walking to/from school.MethodsChildren aged 9¿13 years old participated in an international walk to school competition to win points for themselves, their school and their country over a 4-week period. Walks to and from school were recorded using swipecard technology and a bespoke website. For each point earned by participants, 1 pence (£0.01) was donated to the charity of the school¿s choice. The primary outcome was number of walks to/from school objectively recorded using the swipecard tracking system over the intervention period. Other measures included attitudes towards walking collected at baseline and week 4 (post-intervention). A qualitative sub-study involving focus groups with children, parents and teachers provided further insight.ResultsA total of 3817 children (mean age 11.5¿±¿SD 0.7) from 12 schools in three cities (London and Reading, England and Vancouver, Canada) took part in the intervention, representing a 95% intervention participation rate. Results show a gradual decline in the average number of children walking to and from school over the 4-week period (week 1 mean 29%¿±¿SD2.5; week 2 mean 18%¿±¿SD3.6; week 3 mean 14%¿±¿SD4.0; week 4 mean 12%¿±¿SD1.1). Post intervention, 97% of children felt that walking to school helped them stay healthy, feel happy (81%) and stay alert in class (76%). These results are supported by qualitative findings from children, parents and teachers. Key areas for improvement include the need to incorporate strategies for maintenance of behaviour change into the intervention and also to adopt novel methods of data collection to increase follow-up rates.ConclusionsThis mixed methods study suggests that an international walk to school competition using innovative technology can be feasibly implemented and offers a novel way of engaging schools and motivating children to walk to school.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 29 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 75 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Switzerland 1 1%
Unknown 73 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 20 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 19%
Student > Bachelor 12 16%
Student > Master 12 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 7%
Other 9 12%
Unknown 3 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 16 21%
Social Sciences 12 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 11%
Psychology 6 8%
Other 12 16%
Unknown 11 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 20. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 January 2017.
All research outputs
#932,044
of 14,614,821 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#111
of 3,319 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#19,776
of 282,622 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#2
of 31 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,614,821 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,319 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,622 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 31 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.