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AMD1 mRNA employs ribosome stalling as a mechanism for molecular memory formation

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, January 2018
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (56th percentile)

Citations

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294 Mendeley
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Title
AMD1 mRNA employs ribosome stalling as a mechanism for molecular memory formation
Published in
Nature, January 2018
DOI 10.1038/nature25174
Pubmed ID
Authors

Martina M. Yordanova, Gary Loughran, Alexander V. Zhdanov, Marco Mariotti, Stephen J. Kiniry, Patrick B. F. O’Connor, Dmitry E. Andreev, Ioanna Tzani, Paul Saffert, Audrey M. Michel, Vadim N. Gladyshev, Dmitry B. Papkovsky, John F. Atkins, Pavel V. Baranov

Abstract

In addition to acting as template for protein synthesis, messenger RNA (mRNA) often contains sensory sequence elements that regulate this process. Here we report a new mechanism that limits the number of complete protein molecules that can be synthesized from a single mRNA molecule of the human AMD1 gene encoding adenosylmethionine decarboxylase 1 (AdoMetDC). A small proportion of ribosomes translating AMD1 mRNA stochastically read through the stop codon of the main coding region. These readthrough ribosomes then stall close to the next in-frame stop codon, eventually forming a ribosome queue, the length of which is proportional to the number of AdoMetDC molecules that were synthesized from the same AMD1 mRNA. Once the entire spacer region between the two stop codons is filled with queueing ribosomes, the queue impinges upon the main AMD1 coding region halting its translation. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that this mechanism is highly conserved in vertebrates and existed in their common ancestor. We propose that this mechanism is used to count and limit the number of protein molecules that can be synthesized from a single mRNA template. It could serve to safeguard from dysregulated translation that may occur owing to errors in transcription or mRNA damage.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 135 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 294 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 294 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 74 25%
Researcher 59 20%
Student > Master 36 12%
Student > Bachelor 29 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 4%
Other 32 11%
Unknown 52 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 117 40%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 73 25%
Neuroscience 9 3%
Chemistry 9 3%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 2%
Other 20 7%
Unknown 60 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 118. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2019.
All research outputs
#298,530
of 22,867,327 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#16,562
of 91,042 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,685
of 441,484 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#350
of 804 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,867,327 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 91,042 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 99.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 441,484 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 804 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.