↓ Skip to main content

Expensive lifesaving treatments: allocating resources and maximizing access

Overview of attention for article published in Israel Journal of Health Policy Research, January 2018
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Readers on

mendeley
5 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Expensive lifesaving treatments: allocating resources and maximizing access
Published in
Israel Journal of Health Policy Research, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13584-017-0195-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rachel Nissanholtz-Gannot, David Chinitz

Abstract

Avisar et al. present an exemplary model for outreach aimed at ensuring that a maximum of patients eligible for expensive Hepatitis C (HPC) drugs receive treatment. We enlarge the picture to put their model in the political, economic and regulatory framework for financing and providing these drugs in Israel and a number of other countries. We then return to delivery system level and consider issues such as cost of outreach, the need for health care coordinators and dealing with Hepatitis C patients not yet entitled to receive the drugs under national health coverage determinations.Regarding national coverage decisions, we find that countries such as Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and Israel all extended coverage for Hepatitis C drugs, given the clear high effectiveness of the latter. However, to limit budget impact, all these countries target coverage to patients based on disease genotype and stage.The model presented by Avisar et al., while impressive, leaves some items to address. These include: whether all resources allocated to HPC drugs are actually used for this purpose, the roles of outreach to HPC patients who do not meet the guidelines for treatment, and a comparison of the effectiveness of the model vs. a variety of costs associated with it.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 5 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 5 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 80%
Researcher 1 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 2 40%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 January 2018.
All research outputs
#10,971,864
of 12,381,265 outputs
Outputs from Israel Journal of Health Policy Research
#220
of 311 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#292,887
of 351,961 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Israel Journal of Health Policy Research
#12
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,381,265 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 311 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.7. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 351,961 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.