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The evolution and distribution of noxious species of scorpions (Arachnida: Scorpiones)

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins including Tropical Diseases, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#22 of 465)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
5 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages
video
2 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
31 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
88 Mendeley
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Title
The evolution and distribution of noxious species of scorpions (Arachnida: Scorpiones)
Published in
Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins including Tropical Diseases, January 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40409-017-0138-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wilson R. Lourenço

Abstract

This contribution attempts to bring some general information on the evolution and, in particular, on the geographic distribution of scorpion species noxious to humans. Since 95% of the scorpions incidents are generated by specimens of the family Buthidae C. L. Koch, the analysis will be limited to this familial group. As in previous similar contributions, the content of this work is mostly addressed to non-specialists whose research embraces scorpions in several fields such as venom toxins and public health. Only in recent years, efforts have been made to create better links between 'academic scorpion experts' and other academic non-specialists who use scorpions in their research. Even if a larger progress can yet be expected from such exchanges, crossed information proved to be useful in most fields of scorpion studies. Since the taxonomy of scorpions is complex, misidentifications and even more serious errors concerning scorpion classification/identification are often present in the general literature. Consequently, a precise knowledge of the distribution patterns presented by many scorpion groups and, in particular, those of infamous species, proves to be a key point in the interpretation of final results, leading to a better treatment of the problems caused by infamous scorpion species.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 88 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 88 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 20 23%
Student > Master 13 15%
Other 7 8%
Researcher 7 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 8%
Other 13 15%
Unknown 21 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 23 26%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 15%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 6%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 4 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 3%
Other 14 16%
Unknown 26 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 September 2021.
All research outputs
#2,014,458
of 21,346,872 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins including Tropical Diseases
#22
of 465 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#57,769
of 441,889 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins including Tropical Diseases
#1
of 40 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,346,872 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 465 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 441,889 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 40 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.