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The impact of livestock on the abundance, resting behaviour and sporozoite rate of malaria vectors in southern Tanzania

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, January 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#19 of 3,643)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
10 news outlets
twitter
1 tweeter
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
38 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
105 Mendeley
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Title
The impact of livestock on the abundance, resting behaviour and sporozoite rate of malaria vectors in southern Tanzania
Published in
Malaria Journal, January 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12936-014-0536-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Valeriana S Mayagaya, Gamba Nkwengulila, Issa N Lyimo, Japheti Kihonda, Hassan Mtambala, Hassan Ngonyani, Tanya L Russell, Heather M Ferguson

Abstract

BackgroundIncreases in the coverage of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) have significantly reduced the abundance of Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto in several African settings, leaving its more zoophagic sibling species Anopheles arabiensis as the primary vector. This study investigated the impact of livestock ownership at the household level on the ecology and malaria infection rate of vectors in an area of Tanzania where An. arabiensis accounts for most malaria transmission.MethodsMosquito vectors were collected resting inside houses, animal sheds and in outdoor resting boxes at households with and without livestock over three years in ten villages of the Kilombero Valley, Tanzania. Additionally, the abundance and sporozoite rate of vectors attempting to bite indoors at these households was assessed as an index of malaria exposure.ResultsThe mean abundance of An. gambiae s.l. biting indoors was similar at houses with and without livestock. In all years but one, the relative proportion of An. arabiensis within the An. gambiae s.l. species complex was higher at households with livestock. Livestock presence had a significant impact on malaria vector feeding and resting behaviour. Anopheles arabiensis were generally found resting in cattle sheds where livestock were present, and inside houses when absent. Correspondingly, the human blood index of An. arabiensis and An. funestus s.l. was significant reduced at households with livestock, whereas that of An. gambiae s.s. was unaffectedWhilst there was some evidence that sporozoite rates within the indoor-biting An. gambiae s.l population was significantly reduced at households with livestock, the significance of this effect varied depending on how background spatial variation was accounted for.ConclusionsThese results confirm that the presence of cattle at the household level can significantly alter the local species composition, feeding and resting behaviour of malaria vectors. However, the net impact of this livestock-associated variation in mosquito ecology on malaria exposure risk was unclear. Further investigation is required to distinguish whether the apparently lower sporozoite rates observed in An. gambiae s.l. at households with livestock is really a direct effect of cattle presence, or an indirect consequence of reduced risk within areas where livestock keepers choose to live.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 105 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Madagascar 1 <1%
Tanzania, United Republic of 1 <1%
Unknown 102 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 28 27%
Researcher 23 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 15%
Student > Postgraduate 7 7%
Student > Bachelor 7 7%
Other 15 14%
Unknown 9 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 40 38%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 12%
Environmental Science 12 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 3%
Other 18 17%
Unknown 10 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 75. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 September 2016.
All research outputs
#191,713
of 12,440,542 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#19
of 3,643 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,064
of 268,273 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 57 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,440,542 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,643 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,273 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 57 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.