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An online operational rainfall-monitoring resource for epidemic malaria early warning systems in Africa

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, January 2005
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

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75 Dimensions

Readers on

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158 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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3 Connotea
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Title
An online operational rainfall-monitoring resource for epidemic malaria early warning systems in Africa
Published in
Malaria Journal, January 2005
DOI 10.1186/1475-2875-4-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Emily Grover-Kopec, Mika Kawano, Robert W Klaver, Benno Blumenthal, Pietro Ceccato, Stephen J Connor

Abstract

Periodic epidemics of malaria are a major public health problem for many sub-Saharan African countries. Populations in epidemic prone areas have a poorly developed immunity to malaria and the disease remains life threatening to all age groups. The impact of epidemics could be minimized by prediction and improved prevention through timely vector control and deployment of appropriate drugs. Malaria Early Warning Systems are advocated as a means of improving the opportunity for preparedness and timely response. Rainfall is one of the major factors triggering epidemics in warm semi-arid and desert-fringe areas. Explosive epidemics often occur in these regions after excessive rains and, where these follow periods of drought and poor food security, can be especially severe. Consequently, rainfall monitoring forms one of the essential elements for the development of integrated Malaria Early Warning Systems for sub-Saharan Africa, as outlined by the World Health Organization. The Roll Back Malaria Technical Resource Network on Prevention and Control of Epidemics recommended that a simple indicator of changes in epidemic risk in regions of marginal transmission, consisting primarily of rainfall anomaly maps, could provide immediate benefit to early warning efforts. In response to these recommendations, the Famine Early Warning Systems Network produced maps that combine information about dekadal rainfall anomalies, and epidemic malaria risk, available via their Africa Data Dissemination Service. These maps were later made available in a format that is directly compatible with HealthMapper, the mapping and surveillance software developed by the WHO's Communicable Disease Surveillance and Response Department. A new monitoring interface has recently been developed at the International Research Institute for Climate Prediction (IRI) that enables the user to gain a more contextual perspective of the current rainfall estimates by comparing them to previous seasons and climatological averages. These resources are available at no cost to the user and are updated on a routine basis.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 158 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 2%
Tanzania, United Republic of 2 1%
Indonesia 2 1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Rwanda 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 146 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 38 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 30 19%
Student > Master 28 18%
Student > Bachelor 12 8%
Student > Postgraduate 8 5%
Other 26 16%
Unknown 16 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 34 22%
Environmental Science 22 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 13%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 13 8%
Computer Science 11 7%
Other 36 23%
Unknown 22 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 October 2009.
All research outputs
#6,864,836
of 21,181,573 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#2,287
of 5,305 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#98,279
of 322,723 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,181,573 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,305 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 322,723 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them